Dance Science in Houston: Reflections of IADMS 2017

In October, several members of Trinity Laban Dance Science team had the pleasure of attending the International Association for Dance Medicine and Science (IADMS) annual meeting in Houston, Texas. This was a four day conference, attended by delegates from all over the world, sharing the most up-to-date innovative research in the field of dance medicine and science. The event consisted of lecture and poster presentations, interactive workshops, movement sessions, round table discussions and debates on a variety of topics. These included physiology, biomechanics, nutrition, injury and much more, presented by a diverse range of speakers including physicians, physiotherapists, psychologists, dance educators and scientists. Despite the broad range of professional backgrounds, all delegates and speakers had one thing in common; an involvement in the education, health-care and wellbeing of dancers, and an overall passion for dance medicine and science.

Attending members of the team included Dr Emma Redding (Head of Dance Science), Dr Lucie Clements (Lecturer in Dance Science), Anna Williams and Elizabeth Yutzey (Dance Science Graduate Interns). Our team was also joined by many graduates of the programme and current students. Some of our team and alumni were speakers; presenting their research, leading movement sessions or participating in the panel discussions. We were present for the entire 4 days of the conference and also spent time promoting the work and educational programmes of Trinity Laban at our exhibition stand.

The conference commenced with the opening remarks by IADMS president Professor Matt Wyon, welcoming delegates and speakers and sharing highlights of the four days ahead of us. The conference kicked off to a great start for the TL Dance Science Team – we were very proud to see our very own Dr Emma Redding be presented with the IADMS Dance Educator Award. Congratulations Emma!

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Dr Emma Redding receiving the IADMS Dance Educator Award (Image: Elizabeth Yutzey)

New to the conference this year were the IADMS ‘duels’, where two researchers presented their opposing opinions on prevalent topics of debate in dance science. One notable topic of discussion was ‘Should dancers run?’ arguing whether or not dancers should use running as a form of supplementary training. Another stand out topic was ‘Dancer – athlete or artist’ – with fascinating points raised on both sides of the debate. It was a great session to start the conference and initiate debate among delegates!

Dance Science Graduate Intern Anna was the first of the TL team to present her research, delivering an oral presentation on the prevalence of hypermobility and its relationship with self-reported injury in contemporary dance students. This was Anna’s first time presenting at an international conference since graduating from the MSc programme. This was followed by 2016 graduate Nefeli Tsiouti – who presented three times throughout the conference – the first of which shared her findings of the occurrence of injury in elite break-dancers. Another one of our Dance Science graduates, Dr Sarah Kenny, presented her research on the risk factors for injury in pre-professional ballet and contemporary dancers. That afternoon, Dr Emma Redding and Dr Lucie Clements led a movement session on “Collaborative Research in Dance Science and Creative Practice”, where they talked through their 3 year study into the use of mental imagery in dance. Their workshop shared movement tasks which were included in the intervention study and the psychological ideas that underpin them.

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Dr Emma Redding & Dr Lucie Clements leading their movement sessions on Mental Imagery in Dance (Image: Elizabeth Yutzey)

To conclude the first day, a student and young professional networking event took place which was organised by the IADMS student committee, chaired by MSc graduate Siobhan Mitchell. This was a great event for students from all over the world to meet each other and exchange interests and ideas in the field of dance science. This workshop consisted of several roundtable discussions led by industry professionals from varying backgrounds, giving students and new graduates the opportunity to learn more about potential career pathways to take in the dance medicine and science field. In the evening, all delegates attended the Welcome Reception at the Health Museum, Houston, to socialise and network whilst enjoying some food and drink. A great end to the first day!

Day 2 marked the first of the ‘Special Interest’ days – ‘A Day for Teachers’. The research presented throughout this day was focused on the application of dance medicine and science into the studio, with the aim of enhancing safe and healthy teaching practices. This was another busy day for the TL team.  Firstly, graduate Siobhan Mitchell presented her PhD research on “The Early Maturing Dancer: Challenges and Advantages in UK Vocational Training” which explored the role of maturity timing in young dancers experiences of vocational training. Nefeli Tsiouti led a movement session on the ‘Breakalign Method’, a new conditioning methodology for Break-dancers. Also, Dr Emma Redding, along with Sonia Rafferty and Maggie Morris from Safe In Dance International, led a panel discussion ‘From dance artists to healthy dance advocate: a conversation.’

To finish off Day 2, the Student Committee organised a social event for all the students and recent graduates to get to know each other and network while enjoying some ice cream! It was great to see so many Trinity Laban alumni and current students! Other members of the team attended a local theatre to watch Ad Deum Dance Company, a Houston-based contemporary dance company.

IADMS EXHIBITION
Promoting TL on the exhibition stand: (L-R: Anna Williams, Dr Lucie Clements, Elizabeth Yutzey & Lauren Copping)

Saturday was the last full day of the conference, but nonetheless a full-on day for the team. Dr Emma Redding and Dr Lucie Clements both presented their research on creativity in dance, which was part of the ‘In the Dancer’s Mind’ project. Their first presentation was on a three year study into creativity and mental imagery, followed by the development of dancer’s perceptions of the creative process questionnaire. Meanwhile, for the third time, Nefeli Tsiouti presented her MSc thesis project on the cardiorespiratory fitness of elite break dancers.

As well as oral presentations, our team were presenting their work through posters and movement sessions. Soon to be MSc graduate Chloe Travers presented a poster about her undergraduate dissertation on the role of Micronutrients on soft tissue injury rehabilitation in dancers. This was followed by MSc graduate Christina Mastori, who delivered a movement session investigating sensorimotor learning principles, guiding participants through sequences which encourage instinctual movement choices, with the aim of enhancing kinaesthetic and proprioceptive skills.

Day 3 was also ‘A day for Medics’ – the second of the special interest days – which included many presentations from a clinical perspective, delivered by many different medical practitioners who work closely with or specialise in dance. A vast selection of studies were presented on topics to do with dance injuries, surgery and methods of rehabilitation. To round up a great day, all guests learned some traditional Texas line dancing at the IADMS party.

The final day was a great conclusion to the event, as our team had finished their individual presentations and could relax and enjoy the final day with an array of presentations and interactive sessions to choose from. Dr Emma Redding and Dr Sarah Needham-Beck (along with other industry professionals) took part in a panel discussion directed by pre-planned questions from students and recent graduates. The panel discussed their own in dance medicine and science, reflecting on their career journeys and highlights. Dr Sarah Kenny shared more of her research on injury in dance, delivering a lecture presentation on the interpretations of injury burden in pre-professional dancers.

One particular aspect of the conference that went down well with the TL team was the movement sessions. It was great to attend these workshops to practically, experience the research and knowledge being developed within the field. This was a unique experience that makes the IADMS annual meeting stand out from your usual conference setting.

Another stand out feature of this years’ annual meeting was the IADMS mobile phone app, which allowed delegates to access the schedule and live updates. The structure of the conference meant there were up to four presentations or activity sessions running simultaneously, giving all attendees a choice to pick an area of interest – the conference app proved very useful in making a quick decision of where to go next!  In addition, the conference app could be used to rate and review the presentations and speakers. This was a great opportunity for first-time presenters to receive feedback from other researchers in the field.

As well as being a great networking event for professionals and current researchers, the conference was equally supportive and accommodating for students, from all backgrounds including dance/sports science, kinesiology, physiotherapy and medicine. We were very proud to see so many TL Dance Science alumni, students as well as our Dance Science team present at the event! As our Dance Science programme has produced graduates from all over the world, it was great to all be together in one place, sharing and discussing dance science.

Our Dance Science team and alumni had a fascinating and insightful time at the conference, learning about the current research happening all over the world, as well as having the opportunity to present our own research, represent the work of Trinity Laban and make connections! We are all very excited that next year’s IADMS annual meeting will be held in Helsinki, Finland – we hope to see you there!

IADMS GROUP

TL Dance Science Staff, Alumni and Current Students (Image: Elizabeth Yutzey)

To take a closer look at what our team got up to, or to learn more about our department — like and follow our social media platforms:

Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/trinitylabandancescience/

Instagram: @trinitylaban_dancescience

Written by Anna Williams MSc., Dance Science Graduate Intern

 

STRENGTH AND CONDITIONING FOR THE PERFORMING ARTS

Push!  Pull! Get down! … you may be familiar with these three terms  if you’ve ever attended one of our Strength & Conditioning or HIIT classes in the Conditioning Studio here at Trinity Laban. These free classes are beneficial and open to ALL Trinity Laban students which can support your practice as a dancer, musician, or musical theatre student.

Are you thinking strength and conditioning doesn’t apply to you and your practice? Never trained for strength or conditioning and don’t know how to start?

Read on to learn more about supporting your individual practice and how Trinity Laban is here to support you.

#KickStartSC IS for You!

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Image: Chris Nash Photography and Random Dance

What the science says:

Whether you’re a music student, dance student, or musical theatre student, maintaining physical fitness is important for performance enhancement and injury prevention. Numerous studies on the physical demands of dance have shown that the cardiorespiratory requirements of dance classes are significantly lower than dance performance. This gap between the demands of class and performance leave dancers unprepared for the rigor of performance, resulting in fatigue and in some cases, injury. Further, a high frequency of injury in dancers has been linked to insufficient levels of strength and endurance. It has been recommended that dancers train strength, especially for areas of the body that receive extra load during training, and High Intensity Interval Training (HIIT), which most closely simulates a dance performance setting.

Training in music presents a different set of physical demands on the body. A study examining the physiological demands of music found that music is an intermittent activity with fluctuating cardiorespiratory demands. It was suggested that interval training, such as HIIT, would be a beneficial form of supplementary training to support a musician’s training.  Other studies highlight the high occurrence of overuse injuries in musicians, as well as injuries caused by bad technique habits, and postural misalignments. Strength—especially in areas such as the core or the limbs required to hold or play the musician’s instrument—is needed to support a musicians’ performance without injury.

According to a study from Medical Problems of Performing Artists, musical theatre performers are the “triathletes” of the performing arts. This field of the performing arts involves elements of both dance and music and therefore requires the physical demands of both fields. Additionally, singing while dancing proposes unique demands on the performers’ breathing patterns. Like in dance, it was found that in-class training does not meet the demands of performance in musical theatre. One study found that 46% of their participants reported receiving two injuries per year and 30% receiving three or four per year, with the most common being injuries of the lower extremities.  Based on these findings, it is important for musical theatre performers to engage in supplementary fitness training to prepare for performance conditions.

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Image: Conditioning Studio at TL, JK Photography.

#KickStartSC:

For the first time, the Trinity Laban Conditioning Studio will be putting on a Kick-Start series of strength and conditioning classes taught by Trinity Laban alumni Khyle Eccles, MSc Dance Science, specializing in strength and conditioning for performing artists. This series, which will take place during the first week of Term One, will focus on introducing students to using the Conditioning Studio for supplementary strength and conditioning training.

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Image: Khyle Eccles

Over the previous year, the Strength & Conditioning and HIIT classes taught by Khyle have helped students from all programs to increase their fitness levels and aid them in training and performance. These classes are also great resources for learning principles of strength and conditioning that can be applied to one’s own practice. In the past, students have learned the importance of warm-up and ways to incorporate a sufficient warm up into their practice, how to use all of the various pieces of equipment that exist in the conditioning studio, and that strength and conditioning can be fun and exciting! If Khyle’s enthusiasm and great dance moves don’t get you hooked on these classes, then the benefits on your training will. Each class targets different aspects of training, so attendance at these classes will always apply to you and could result in increased jump height for all the dancing needs, increased endurance for long performances, or increased upper body strength for holding up those instruments day after day.

Come join us this coming week for #KickStartSC and see what this is all about!

Written by Elizabeth Yutzey

Dance Science Graduate Intern

Reflection on placement with Trinity Laban Dance Science

Recently I completed a 40 hour placement with Trinity Laban in the Dance Science and Health departments. I gained an insight into the research that takes place at Trinity Laban, the MSc Dance Science programme, and the busy lives of everyone involved in making it such a wonderful and inspiring place to be.

I’m currently a third year student on the undergraduate Dance course at Kingston University and planned to do this placement in the hope of finding out more about the Dance Science world and what career paths I could take in this area. Let’s not forget that Trinity Laban offered the first Dance Science Master’s degree in the world, so it really felt like I was at the heart of all the action, at the number one place to be! It was really interesting to talk to the likes of Dr Emma Redding (Head of Dance Science at Trinity Laban) and Edel Quin (Programme Leader MSc Dance Science at Trinity Laban), who both have a lot of experience in Dance Science and have developed the Dance Science course at Trinity Laban. But it was equally fascinating to talk to the Graduate Interns (who had completed the MSc at Trinity Laban), and everyone in between, to discover everyone’s plans for the future.

I was also lucky enough to undertake my placement the same week that the Dance Science department had their Health Interdisciplinary Day, and so I learnt the difficulties of ‘measuring’ results in research studies. I also learnt the difference dance can make in community settings, and the wide range of participants the department work with, whether school children or hospital patients. What I found most valuable, not only on this day but throughout the whole week, was the impact that qualitative data has. Before I started my placement I had only thought about the importance and relevance of quantitative data. Over the week, I learnt that deciding what to measure and recording qualitative changes is really hard, as in the dance field researchers are dealing with the complexity of the human body and not just a ‘lab rat’. The problem the Dance Science world then face is that, given how new and evolving the field is, it is a challenge to guess what kind of research will be awarded funding.

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It was also exciting working with Lucie Clements (PhD Candidate and Guest Lecturer), getting a sneak peek into the psychological work the department are currently doing with international colleagues on the motivational environments dancers work in and the type of environment dancers would prefer. This allowed me to learn more about the psychological side of Dance Science.  When I arrived at Trinity Laban I only really had basic knowledge on the physiological side of the field and this is what attracted me towards the area. I left Trinity Laban having more knowledge on both physical and mental aspects, and if anything being more interested into how psychological research in Dance Science can help not only dancers but also other communities.

Overall I can say that I really enjoyed my week long placement in the Dance Science and Health departments at Trinity Laban. All the staff and students were really welcoming, which made every activity enjoyable whether interviewing staff, learning about the equipment in the science lab and conditioning studio, or even formatting documents! Now I have completed my placement I can say I’m even more eager to have a career within Dance Science and so I would like to thank everyone who helped or talked to me during the week.

 

I hope to see you all soon!

 

Rhiannon Bromley, BA Dance student, Kingston University.

Performance Anxiety

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Stage fright, the heebie jeebies, a bad case of the willies. Call it what you will, but one thing is for sure, performance anxiety is the cruel mistress of many performing artists.

According to a recent survey conducted by Help Musicians UK, 75% of musicians said they had suffered from performance anxiety. Similarly, research from One Dance UK demonstrated that 92% of dancers had experienced psychological difficulty in the last 12 months, with over 30% experiencing performance anxiety. But what exactly is performance anxiety, why does it happen, and the big one we all want the answer to; how on earth do we get a grip of it?

Lets get down to the science-y bit. Psychologists seem to agree that anxiety manifests in two key ways; somatically and cognitively. Somatic symptoms are those we experience physically, such as sweating, racing hearts and needing the bathroom, causing us to feel agitated and uncomfortable. They’re all signs that our body is out of sync with its neutral state, signs of physiological arousal. These experiences are common in all pressurised situations, from test-taking, public speaking and sport, to the performing arts, dance and music. For some, symptoms occur long before performance, from early days in rehearsal. For others, symptoms hit us like a tonne of bricks, right out of the blue, when we’re standing in the wings.

Now here’s the interesting stuff. All of these symptoms have something else in common, something which differs vastly from anxiety. They’re all symptoms of excitement. Just like that feeling of waking up on your birthday, or falling in love, they are symptoms that are telling us that we are energised, ready for action, and prepared to experience something deeply rewarding, of great value.

But what about those cognitive symptoms, those we experience mentally such as worry, apprehension and nerves that ultimately can lead us to a mental block? There’s pretty solid evidence that performance anxiety occurs when an individual perceives an imbalance between the demands made, and their capacity to meet the demands. The key word here is perceived. What if we changed our perceptions of our symptoms, and our perceptions of performance? What if we changed up our mind-set and tried interpreting those symptoms as a sign of preparedness, and positive anticipation. Research we’ve carried out both here at Trinity Laban, and research by international colleagues, demonstrated that perceiving an upcoming performance as a challenge (a chance to thrive and demonstrate competency) rather than a threat (a chance to fail) lead to decreased anxiety experiences in both the days leading up to and very moments prior to performance.

Next time you have an assessment, performance or audition coming up, notice your immediate somatic response. Your interpretation is key. Is this related to a threat? Or actually, is this an optimal challenge? Is your mental investment really worry, or is thinking about an upcoming audition merely a sign that this is something of real value to you, an exciting experience? Learning to change mental habits is by no means an easy process, but a process it certainly is – which means time, patience and trial and error are key. Reframing your thoughts about your next performance may be the first steps towards managing your performance anxiety, and developing healthy techniques for looking after your psychological wellbeing is just as important as nurturing your dance or music technique.

 

Lucie Clements, PhD candidate Dance Science & Lecturer in Performance Psychology.

Cooldown

The term cool down is frequently referenced within our dance practice, it’s seldom incorporated into our dance sessions by practitioners and is often expected to be a component of our personal structure.

So what is it all about? This article aims to provide you with a background on the subject and to offer suggestions as how to implement informed strategies into your daily dance practice.

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Here’s the science bit:

Cool down is also referred to as ‘active recovery’, this involves reducing the heart rate slowly after exercise. The intention is to avoid a sharp decline in heart rate which in turn will facilitate circulation, the removal of waste products, avoiding muscle soreness and cramping.

Some extra information:

During exercise that is predominately focused on your legs, your heart will send blood to those muscles to ensure that you are able to fulfill those movements. This means that there will be a lack of blood circulating from your heart to your legs and back to your heart.

If you were to sit down straight after your dance session your heart rate will plummet and the blood will not effectively circulate back to the heart. The burning sensation that you may often feel after leg intensive exercise is caused by blood lactate, some level of this is beneficial, but if it remains present in your leg muscles after class, it may result in muscle soreness, cramping and poor recovery.

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You could instead try the following:

  • 10 minutes of slowed down dance specific movements from the choreography you were performing, followed by 5 minutes of your favourite stretches
  • If you have just done a workout of weights/ running, cool-down with 5-10 minutes of light jogging on the treadmill/ cross-trainer/ exercise bike
  • Do this at 60-70% of your maximum heart rate (use fitbits, apple watches or the heart rate monitor on gym equipment to help you calculate this)

Here’s an example:

If you are 18 years old

  • Subtract 18 from 220

220-18= 202

  • 202 beats per minute (bpm) is your maximum heart rate for intense exercise/ dance

 

To work out the your heart rate for optimal cool-down benefits (60-70%)

  • 60% of 202 bpm= 0.60 x 202= 121 bpm
  • 70% of 202 bpm= 0.70 x 202= 141 bpm

 

So as an 18 year old if you reduce your heart rate to between 121 and 141 beats per minute, you will have the best chance of reducing blood lactate and heart rate.

Your benefits:

  • Following this process will help you to recover properly from your dance classes
  • It will optimise your next performance level
  • Make your body feel more energised and less achy
  • Make you feel less tired and feint after classes

 

Common issues:

“I don’t have time between classes”

If you are heading across to another class your heart rate will reduce anyway. The important thing to remember is to stay lightly active for 15 minutes, this is preferable to sitting or collapsing on the floor.

“But I stretch after my class, isn’t that cooling down?”

Stretching is part of the cooling down process but not the entirety of it. Try to follow this rule:

  1. Light activity at 60-70% of your maximum heart rate
  2. Dynamic stretching
  3. Static stretching

In conclusion, developing a better understanding of the cool down process will help you to understand your body. You will be able to control your recovery better during those busy times at university and take care of those dancing legs.

 

Seema De Jorge-Chopra MSc

Dance Science Graduate Intern

 

Post-Exercise Muscular Soreness

Feeling like you’ve gone 10 rounds with Mike Tyson for a day or two after you’ve done a serious workout?

We all know the feeling- stairs? Not a chance.

But why do our muscles hurt so much when we’ve been working so hard?

Post-Exercise Soreness explained.

The DOMS

Delayed Onset Muscle Soreness: refers to the potential reaction our bodies have when we take up a new exercise plan, adapt an existing exercise plan or alter the intensity or duration of regular physical exertion. This may happen regardless of our fitness levels and although often unwelcomed, it can be the sign of a Physiologically Positive Reaction.

DOMS usually develops between 12-24 hours after the activity itself. We’ve all heard the phrase ‘that’ll hurt tomorrow’ but the truth is the greatest discomfort is often experienced between 24-72 hours post-exercise. Although DOMS can be associated with a positive reaction, is often a sign that you need to take a rest, this is useful feedback from your body.  If you are experiencing symptoms associated with DOMS, to include muscles soreness ‘tender to touch’ and reduced joint mobility, this may lead to instability if not well rested. Instability and weakness combined with muscle soreness and fatigue can lead to injury.

What’s happening?

There is some controversy surrounding the cause of DOMS, however most believe that DOMS is the repair process that develops as a response to the microscopic damage of our muscle fibres likely stemming from novel stresses that were experienced during the exercise.

A common misconception is that DOMS is due to lactic acid build up however it is generally believed that lactic acid is not involved in the DOMS process.

Activities which are thought to result in DOMS are ones which cause muscles to lengthen whilst a force is being applied, also known as an eccentric muscle action. There are three main actions; Concentric, Isometric and Eccentric- The notion of a concentric chest press evokes a much more stressful loading onto the muscles than let’s say a handstand where an Isometric action is seen. However eccentric movements such as the lowering phase in a bicep curl are considered structurally, to cause a higher stress level on muscle fibres than the aforementioned. Try and work your way gradually into a new exercise program to help reduce the severity of DOMS!

 There is a fine line between positive, and injury provoking muscular ‘pain’.

Every body is different and you must remember to listen to yours.

As performing artists we should not be working towards ‘pain’. We should only push our bodies to a certain level, and DOMS is a welcomed indication that we have pushed our bodies a little beyond their normal comfort zone. If you do experience pain during an exercise this could be an underlying factor of over intensified exercise or incorrect form, you should consult a medical practitioner if pain persists and exceeds regular DOMS symptoms.

It is important to remember eccentric movements are to be treated as one ingredient within a well-tailored exercise plan, combining concentric and isometric movement will make for a well-rounded workout. Mastering technique, control and stability within movements will lower the risk of injury and in turn DOMS.

Does Massage Help?

Massage is an extensive physiological tool that eases muscle and joint stiffness. The hands on approach of massage works towards reducing tension within the body, combined with passive movements that not only stretch the connective tissues around our joints, but lengthens muscles and tendons too.  Sports Massage may help prevent the onset of injury, work as a tool to rehabilitate and in turn may improve performance. With classes, rehearsals, shows and tours on the horizon pushing bodies to outside of their regular comfort zone, Dancers, Musicians and Musical Theatre performers may consider seeking treatment in order to gain immediate relief for muscle soreness. It can also be applied post-event to remove waste products/toxins, speed up recovery time and de-stress after a performance.

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Don’t forget TL Health offers Sports Massage where TL Students receive a brilliant discount!

http://www.trinitylaban.ac.uk/trinity-laban-health/health-treatments/sports-massage

Jess Coleman: Graduate Intern, Health.

Happy New Year, Healthful Hints for 2017!

Here we are again, the start of another brand new year, time for turning over a new leaf, resolutions and planning the year ahead, bring on 2017!

At Trinity Laban Health we want to make sure performing artists are supported in their training and professional careers, and what better time for us to give you a few hints and tips to help you get off to good start this new year.

Supplementary Training, make it more than a resolution…

Supplementary training can benefit you as a performing artist and help to enhance your performance in a variety of ways. Whether you are new to training outside of your performance art, or whether you are getting back into training after a well-earned Christmas break, you should consider asking yourself which areas of your performance you would like to improve or support, for example do you want to boost your cardiovascular fitness to support playing a wind instrument? Or perhaps you want to work on lower limb endurance ahead of an upcoming dance performance. Whatever your new year goals may be, we have facilities which could help you towards achieving them.

As a student of Trinity Laban you would have access to our Conditioning Studio and FREE classes such as Yoga, Pilates and Strength & Conditioning, which could help support your training and help you stick to those supplementary training resolutions.

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Look after your performing body…

Being a performing artist can mean that there are certain demands placed upon your body which may increase risk of injury. At Trinity Laban Health we have a variety of treatments which can not only help you if you do become injured, but can also aid in the prevention of injury. Tell me more I hear you say! So what treatments do we have to offer? Well firstly, all of our therapists/practitioners share a particular interest in performing artists’ health. They are highly skilled and experienced when it comes to working with those in the field of dance, music and musical theatre. Our treatments include Physiotherapy, Sports massage, Acupuncture, Acupressure massage, Craniosacral, Feldenkrais, Reflexology (look out for future blog posts for a more in depth discussion of the therapies and practitioners). There is a treatment to suit all aches, niggles and pains and treatments for example, Sports massage can be a good way to help prevent injury.

Along with all of your other 2017 resolutions we also hope you plan to look after your overall well-being by ensuring you get enough rest and sleep – giving your body time to unwind and relax can really go a long way to help make sure you are optimising your performance. Nutrition, including hydration is also incredibly important, once a term here at Trinity Laban Health we have Nutritionist Jasmine Challis, who runs a clinic and specialises in performing artists’ diets. Ensuring your food and fluid intake is supporting your activity level is essential to maintain a healthy you!

If you would like to know any more about our Conditioning studio, treatments or for any other queries please contact the health department via the Trinity Laban website www.trinitylaban.ac.uk/health or email us health@trinitylaban.ac.uk . We look forward to hearing from you and wish you a very happy and healthy 2017!

Felicity Beach

Graduate Intern Health