Variety of Uses for Sports Massage

What is sports massage? 

Sports massage is a type of therapy that focuses on the soft tissues in the body. This includes skin, muscle, tendons, ligaments and fascia which is a form of connective tissue that lines other soft tissues. Sports massage involves the manipulation of these soft tissues and can also include different massage techniques and types of stretching



Image: Sports massage, JK Photography 

What is sports massage suitable for?

Sports massage can be suitable for dealing with many different conditions from sport related overuse issues, to back pain from your office chair. These benefits can be split into four main areas; injury, maintenance, pre-event and post-event.

Injury:  Sports massage has many benefits that can help reduce the risk of injury as well as be used for remedial purposes to help reduce tightness and pain. Sports massage is great at helping to detect muscular imbalances and any potential deep tissue damage which can result in a reduced risk of injury. A key benefit of sports massage is increasing blood flow through the tissues which can lead to faster recovery times and reduce the delayed onset of muscle soreness (or DOMS for short).

Maintenance: Having regular massages can help to keep muscles healthy and supple and can reduce the need for future treatment. Studies have shown that having regular sports massages can help to improve range of motion and flexibility. This in itself can also contribute to lowering injury risk, especially among dancers, for whom flexibility is desired. Having regular massages can also help to identify any particular areas of tension or stress and can increase your overall awareness and education surrounding your body. This can in turn help you to improve your performance and self-manage any conditions you have.

Pre-event: Feeling nervous and tense before a show or performance? Sports massage can stimulate circulation through the body and reduce tension which can be beneficial to help you be on top form before that audition!

Post-event: Sports massage can be just as useful after an event! It can help speed up recovery times, remove toxins and waste products from the body, de-stress you and help fight any delayed muscle soreness you may feel the following day. 



Image: Sports massage, JK Photography 

Sports massage is one of those treatments which can be used in a variety of different ways, and is most effective when used regularly. So whether your a performer, office worker or athlete sports massage can be a useful tool to help maintain a healthy body and banish those tense muscles when they arise!


Written by Rebecca Appleton 

Graduate Intern for Health 





ENJOYING CHRISTMAS BREAK? The benefits of rest and relaxation

As Christmas fast approaches, many of you will be taking time away from the studio or work to take a well-earned break! But a lot of people don’t know enough about the multiple benefits that utilising proper rest and relaxation can bring.

‘Rest’ is anything that gives you a break and can be either physical or mental. There are multiple benefits for everyone and especially for performing artists. This is partly a result of the many physiological changes that can occur when utilising rest and relaxation successfully. These changes can include

  • reduced blood pressure
  • reduced muscle tension
  • reduced sensitivity to pain
  • improved immunity
  • increased circulation
  • slowed breathing rate

Another key benefit of rest and relaxation is that it can reduce the effects of stress. Stress can cause disruption to daily life in many forms including sleep and digestion, as well as increasing aches and pains and the likelihood of getting ill (coughs, colds etc.). Taking time out to rest and relax can help to tackle stress and keep our bodies and minds healthy.


Image: Trinity Laban matwork class; JK photography 


In what other ways can it benefit me as a performing artist?                       The benefits of rest and relaxation can include both physiological and behavioural advantages which can be important for performing artists. Studies have reported that relaxation can reduce mood fluctuations and increase concentration. Also, rest is key for muscle regeneration. This means that in order to see progression in physical training, one must rest or the muscles will not be able to regenerate and you will see no improvements. This is important for performing artists to keep in mind as there is often a tendency to want to train all the time and take little rest in order to improve. However, in actual fact this can inhibit physical progression and could increase the risk of injury. Research has shown that performers, especially dancers, often work through fatigue and that overuse is one of the most common causes of injuries among dancers.

Not obtaining enough rest can also increase the likelihood of overtraining and can even lead to burnout. This is a complex condition and can be acute or chronic, and is the result of a volume of activity/exercise that exceeds the performer’s capabilities. Overtraining and burnout can both increases the risk of injury also, as the body can be more susceptible to muscle damage, infections, allergies and will take longer to heal from even minor scratches. Research has also shown that taking time to review a piece of music or choreography mentally as well as physically, can be much more beneficial than just physically rehearsing alone, which could be a good way to tackle overtraining among performers.

How can I rest and relax properly?                                                                   It is ideal if you can set aside a certain amount of time each day or week to just rest and relax . This can be anything that gives your mind or body a break and can range from just having an early night or a weekend off, to participating yoga classes or doing breathing exercises. Research suggests that constructive/active rest can also be beneficial, which simply requires you to lie in a resting state and focus your mind on a particular task.

So enjoy taking some time out over Christmas to rest and relax and begin the New Year with a great start! #dancersneedrest


Dance Science in Houston: Reflections of IADMS 2017

In October, several members of Trinity Laban Dance Science team had the pleasure of attending the International Association for Dance Medicine and Science (IADMS) annual meeting in Houston, Texas. This was a four day conference, attended by delegates from all over the world, sharing the most up-to-date innovative research in the field of dance medicine and science. The event consisted of lecture and poster presentations, interactive workshops, movement sessions, round table discussions and debates on a variety of topics. These included physiology, biomechanics, nutrition, injury and much more, presented by a diverse range of speakers including physicians, physiotherapists, psychologists, dance educators and scientists. Despite the broad range of professional backgrounds, all delegates and speakers had one thing in common; an involvement in the education, health-care and wellbeing of dancers, and an overall passion for dance medicine and science.

Attending members of the team included Dr Emma Redding (Head of Dance Science), Dr Lucie Clements (Lecturer in Dance Science), Anna Williams and Elizabeth Yutzey (Dance Science Graduate Interns). Our team was also joined by many graduates of the programme and current students. Some of our team and alumni were speakers; presenting their research, leading movement sessions or participating in the panel discussions. We were present for the entire 4 days of the conference and also spent time promoting the work and educational programmes of Trinity Laban at our exhibition stand.

The conference commenced with the opening remarks by IADMS president Professor Matt Wyon, welcoming delegates and speakers and sharing highlights of the four days ahead of us. The conference kicked off to a great start for the TL Dance Science Team – we were very proud to see our very own Dr Emma Redding be presented with the IADMS Dance Educator Award. Congratulations Emma!


Dr Emma Redding receiving the IADMS Dance Educator Award (Image: Elizabeth Yutzey)

New to the conference this year were the IADMS ‘duels’, where two researchers presented their opposing opinions on prevalent topics of debate in dance science. One notable topic of discussion was ‘Should dancers run?’ arguing whether or not dancers should use running as a form of supplementary training. Another stand out topic was ‘Dancer – athlete or artist’ – with fascinating points raised on both sides of the debate. It was a great session to start the conference and initiate debate among delegates!

Dance Science Graduate Intern Anna was the first of the TL team to present her research, delivering an oral presentation on the prevalence of hypermobility and its relationship with self-reported injury in contemporary dance students. This was Anna’s first time presenting at an international conference since graduating from the MSc programme. This was followed by 2016 graduate Nefeli Tsiouti – who presented three times throughout the conference – the first of which shared her findings of the occurrence of injury in elite break-dancers. Another one of our Dance Science graduates, Dr Sarah Kenny, presented her research on the risk factors for injury in pre-professional ballet and contemporary dancers. That afternoon, Dr Emma Redding and Dr Lucie Clements led a movement session on “Collaborative Research in Dance Science and Creative Practice”, where they talked through their 3 year study into the use of mental imagery in dance. Their workshop shared movement tasks which were included in the intervention study and the psychological ideas that underpin them.


Dr Emma Redding & Dr Lucie Clements leading their movement sessions on Mental Imagery in Dance (Image: Elizabeth Yutzey)

To conclude the first day, a student and young professional networking event took place which was organised by the IADMS student committee, chaired by MSc graduate Siobhan Mitchell. This was a great event for students from all over the world to meet each other and exchange interests and ideas in the field of dance science. This workshop consisted of several roundtable discussions led by industry professionals from varying backgrounds, giving students and new graduates the opportunity to learn more about potential career pathways to take in the dance medicine and science field. In the evening, all delegates attended the Welcome Reception at the Health Museum, Houston, to socialise and network whilst enjoying some food and drink. A great end to the first day!

Day 2 marked the first of the ‘Special Interest’ days – ‘A Day for Teachers’. The research presented throughout this day was focused on the application of dance medicine and science into the studio, with the aim of enhancing safe and healthy teaching practices. This was another busy day for the TL team.  Firstly, graduate Siobhan Mitchell presented her PhD research on “The Early Maturing Dancer: Challenges and Advantages in UK Vocational Training” which explored the role of maturity timing in young dancers experiences of vocational training. Nefeli Tsiouti led a movement session on the ‘Breakalign Method’, a new conditioning methodology for Break-dancers. Also, Dr Emma Redding, along with Sonia Rafferty and Maggie Morris from Safe In Dance International, led a panel discussion ‘From dance artists to healthy dance advocate: a conversation.’

To finish off Day 2, the Student Committee organised a social event for all the students and recent graduates to get to know each other and network while enjoying some ice cream! It was great to see so many Trinity Laban alumni and current students! Other members of the team attended a local theatre to watch Ad Deum Dance Company, a Houston-based contemporary dance company.

Promoting TL on the exhibition stand: (L-R: Anna Williams, Dr Lucie Clements, Elizabeth Yutzey & Lauren Copping)

Saturday was the last full day of the conference, but nonetheless a full-on day for the team. Dr Emma Redding and Dr Lucie Clements both presented their research on creativity in dance, which was part of the ‘In the Dancer’s Mind’ project. Their first presentation was on a three year study into creativity and mental imagery, followed by the development of dancer’s perceptions of the creative process questionnaire. Meanwhile, for the third time, Nefeli Tsiouti presented her MSc thesis project on the cardiorespiratory fitness of elite break dancers.

As well as oral presentations, our team were presenting their work through posters and movement sessions. Soon to be MSc graduate Chloe Travers presented a poster about her undergraduate dissertation on the role of Micronutrients on soft tissue injury rehabilitation in dancers. This was followed by MSc graduate Christina Mastori, who delivered a movement session investigating sensorimotor learning principles, guiding participants through sequences which encourage instinctual movement choices, with the aim of enhancing kinaesthetic and proprioceptive skills.

Day 3 was also ‘A day for Medics’ – the second of the special interest days – which included many presentations from a clinical perspective, delivered by many different medical practitioners who work closely with or specialise in dance. A vast selection of studies were presented on topics to do with dance injuries, surgery and methods of rehabilitation. To round up a great day, all guests learned some traditional Texas line dancing at the IADMS party.

The final day was a great conclusion to the event, as our team had finished their individual presentations and could relax and enjoy the final day with an array of presentations and interactive sessions to choose from. Dr Emma Redding and Dr Sarah Needham-Beck (along with other industry professionals) took part in a panel discussion directed by pre-planned questions from students and recent graduates. The panel discussed their own in dance medicine and science, reflecting on their career journeys and highlights. Dr Sarah Kenny shared more of her research on injury in dance, delivering a lecture presentation on the interpretations of injury burden in pre-professional dancers.

One particular aspect of the conference that went down well with the TL team was the movement sessions. It was great to attend these workshops to practically, experience the research and knowledge being developed within the field. This was a unique experience that makes the IADMS annual meeting stand out from your usual conference setting.

Another stand out feature of this years’ annual meeting was the IADMS mobile phone app, which allowed delegates to access the schedule and live updates. The structure of the conference meant there were up to four presentations or activity sessions running simultaneously, giving all attendees a choice to pick an area of interest – the conference app proved very useful in making a quick decision of where to go next!  In addition, the conference app could be used to rate and review the presentations and speakers. This was a great opportunity for first-time presenters to receive feedback from other researchers in the field.

As well as being a great networking event for professionals and current researchers, the conference was equally supportive and accommodating for students, from all backgrounds including dance/sports science, kinesiology, physiotherapy and medicine. We were very proud to see so many TL Dance Science alumni, students as well as our Dance Science team present at the event! As our Dance Science programme has produced graduates from all over the world, it was great to all be together in one place, sharing and discussing dance science.

Our Dance Science team and alumni had a fascinating and insightful time at the conference, learning about the current research happening all over the world, as well as having the opportunity to present our own research, represent the work of Trinity Laban and make connections! We are all very excited that next year’s IADMS annual meeting will be held in Helsinki, Finland – we hope to see you there!


TL Dance Science Staff, Alumni and Current Students (Image: Elizabeth Yutzey)

To take a closer look at what our team got up to, or to learn more about our department — like and follow our social media platforms:


Instagram: @trinitylaban_dancescience

Written by Anna Williams MSc., Dance Science Graduate Intern



Push!  Pull! Get down! … you may be familiar with these three terms  if you’ve ever attended one of our Strength & Conditioning or HIIT classes in the Conditioning Studio here at Trinity Laban. These free classes are beneficial and open to ALL Trinity Laban students which can support your practice as a dancer, musician, or musical theatre student.

Are you thinking strength and conditioning doesn’t apply to you and your practice? Never trained for strength or conditioning and don’t know how to start?

Read on to learn more about supporting your individual practice and how Trinity Laban is here to support you.

#KickStartSC IS for You!


Image: Chris Nash Photography and Random Dance

What the science says:

Whether you’re a music student, dance student, or musical theatre student, maintaining physical fitness is important for performance enhancement and injury prevention. Numerous studies on the physical demands of dance have shown that the cardiorespiratory requirements of dance classes are significantly lower than dance performance. This gap between the demands of class and performance leave dancers unprepared for the rigor of performance, resulting in fatigue and in some cases, injury. Further, a high frequency of injury in dancers has been linked to insufficient levels of strength and endurance. It has been recommended that dancers train strength, especially for areas of the body that receive extra load during training, and High Intensity Interval Training (HIIT), which most closely simulates a dance performance setting.

Training in music presents a different set of physical demands on the body. A study examining the physiological demands of music found that music is an intermittent activity with fluctuating cardiorespiratory demands. It was suggested that interval training, such as HIIT, would be a beneficial form of supplementary training to support a musician’s training.  Other studies highlight the high occurrence of overuse injuries in musicians, as well as injuries caused by bad technique habits, and postural misalignments. Strength—especially in areas such as the core or the limbs required to hold or play the musician’s instrument—is needed to support a musicians’ performance without injury.

According to a study from Medical Problems of Performing Artists, musical theatre performers are the “triathletes” of the performing arts. This field of the performing arts involves elements of both dance and music and therefore requires the physical demands of both fields. Additionally, singing while dancing proposes unique demands on the performers’ breathing patterns. Like in dance, it was found that in-class training does not meet the demands of performance in musical theatre. One study found that 46% of their participants reported receiving two injuries per year and 30% receiving three or four per year, with the most common being injuries of the lower extremities.  Based on these findings, it is important for musical theatre performers to engage in supplementary fitness training to prepare for performance conditions.


Image: Conditioning Studio at TL, JK Photography.


For the first time, the Trinity Laban Conditioning Studio will be putting on a Kick-Start series of strength and conditioning classes taught by Trinity Laban alumni Khyle Eccles, MSc Dance Science, specializing in strength and conditioning for performing artists. This series, which will take place during the first week of Term One, will focus on introducing students to using the Conditioning Studio for supplementary strength and conditioning training.

Khyle 1.jpg

Image: Khyle Eccles

Over the previous year, the Strength & Conditioning and HIIT classes taught by Khyle have helped students from all programs to increase their fitness levels and aid them in training and performance. These classes are also great resources for learning principles of strength and conditioning that can be applied to one’s own practice. In the past, students have learned the importance of warm-up and ways to incorporate a sufficient warm up into their practice, how to use all of the various pieces of equipment that exist in the conditioning studio, and that strength and conditioning can be fun and exciting! If Khyle’s enthusiasm and great dance moves don’t get you hooked on these classes, then the benefits on your training will. Each class targets different aspects of training, so attendance at these classes will always apply to you and could result in increased jump height for all the dancing needs, increased endurance for long performances, or increased upper body strength for holding up those instruments day after day.

Come join us this coming week for #KickStartSC and see what this is all about!

Written by Elizabeth Yutzey

Dance Science Graduate Intern

Stress management and finding alternative treatments: an undergraduate dancer’s perspective.

Undergraduate Contemporary Dance Student Bethan Cooper is in her final year at Trinity Laban Conservatoire of Music and Dance and has been doing work experience across both the Health and Dance Science departments. As part of her time with us she has written a blog piece focusing on stress management and the use of alternative treatments. You can read her thoughts below:

Stress management and finding alternative treatments

So what are the common causes and effects of stress on the dancer? With Independent Project season coming to a close and Commissioned Works, Historical Project and Performance Project fast approaching it’s a demanding time for dance students. What can you do to keep your body healthy (and injury free) so that you can get the most out of it?We know the basics:

  • Eating well
  • Staying hydrated
  • Getting enough sleep
  • Effective warm ups and cool downs…

But sometimes bodies can become overwhelmed by sudden changes in practice, so it is important to notice any aches, niggles or complaints before they become bigger problems.

Have you ever noticed an awkward “jump” in your movement whilst executing slow or fluid material? The body is very good at managing itself and finding solutions to problems, and will continue to compensate in many amazing ways until these problems become more substantial. In order to prevent injury, it can be valuable to seek treatments that will contribute to your overall wellness.

It is important to find the right treatment for you, be it physiotherapy, acupuncture or maybe a super intense sports massage! However, occasionally a non-invasive approach will be beneficial.

Why choose Craniosacral Therapy?

Craniosacral treatment is a more holistic approach, where practitioners use light touch, encouraging the body to heal itself. Clients can enjoy a gentle and relaxing hour where the body can take its time to absorb and realise small changes. The treatment aims to work not only with the body, but with the person as a whole, and so has psychological benefits too! This attention to the person as a whole can help address injuries, but also underlying issues behind the injury.

Practitioners work with the fluids and fascia in the body (the connective tissue that holds us together). A particularly important line of fascia for dancers is The Deep Front Line – a long line of tissue connecting the toes to the tongue (and linking muscles such as the psoas and diaphragm along the way).


There are also links between Craniosacral Therapy and many of the somatic approaches used in dance – practices such as Alexander Technique or Feldenkrais, which can all be relevant and supportive to your release-based training!

TL practitioners

Marina Collard uses her years of knowledge and experience of dance to inform her practice, making her the ideal practitioner for us dancers! She believes the treatment encourages clients to find a heightened sense of awareness in themselves and their bodies. This kind of physical enquiry can support dancers in optimising the body they have, keeping it open and available for movement. The treatment can also aid stress management; allowing clients time to slow down, inhabit their bodies and reach a more embodied state.

If you would like to know any more about Craniosacral Therapy treatment or have any other queries please contact the health department via the Trinity Laban website or email .

Bethan Cooper

BA3 Contemporary Dance Student, Trinity Laban


 Musicians, don’t cramp your style!

In the last 20 years musicians’ medicine has become increasingly popular. But are musicians aware of the prevalence of injury and how best to treat them?

An article published under The British Association for Performing Arts Medicine (BAPAM) couldn’t have said it better…

‘Musicians should think of themselves as athletes.’


The physical and psychological demands that come hand in hand with being a musician, are no different to that of a dancer or perhaps even a rugby player?! It is essential that Musicians are attentive to their physical needs, limitations, and work, to condition their bodies accordingly.

The repetitive nature of a musicians’ repertoire, lengthy rehearsals and performances, tests posture and muscle strength, so it probably comes as no surprise that the vast majority of injuries sustained include repetitive strain, lower back pain and Tendonitis, to name but a few. However a study of 1046 musicians conducted by BAPAM in 2004, suggested 52% of injuries recorded were due to performance-related issues, such as overwork and incorrect practice or technique when playing their instruments.

Having said this an injury or trauma can be sustained by simply completing a harmless day to day activity, therefore it is essential that the treatment process is managed with the musician’s instrument and the demands of the lifestyle at the focal point. When assessing and treating a musician, a holistic ‘whole body’ approach is paramount- regardless of the type of treatment, the plan should be tailored to the individual artist!

All musicians face limitations, the physical dimensions of an instrument requires the musician to make adjustments to the body, muscles and tendons can be put under strain or ‘unusual’ positions during this modification. To maintain a high performance level, musicians may need to take preventive action or seek treatment that can help strengthen essential core muscles or correct muscle imbalances, thus keeping those dreaded repetitive strain injuries at bay!

Reduce the risk of time away from your passion…

PHYSIOTHERAPHY works towards improving your physical performance and reducing the risk of further injury by developing a biomechanical understanding of how you play. Forms of treatment can range from exercise referral, postural analysis (taking your instrument into consideration), manual mobilisations, dry needling and taping where necessary. These techniques collaborate to address the factors mentioned above, focusing on building strength to support and stabilise muscle imbalances and weaknesses.

ACUPUNCTURE is the balance of energetics of the mind and body. Chinese medicine techniques boost the uptake of oxygen and dissemination to our muscles, thus minimising those pesky cramps. Working to relieve tension, throughout the body it is a saving grace for shoulder and back pain. Did I mention its holistic approach to the body, treating headaches, anxiety and insomnia?

PILATES is a great tool for musicians. A typical Pilates class includes exercises to build or ‘restore’ endurance, flexibility, trunk and pelvic stability, muscle balance, strength, and efficient breathing patterns. Every one of these can help a musician to play a longer repertoire with less fatigue.

SPORTS MASSAGE works to relieve muscle tension as well as improve circulation, flexibility and posture. Whether it be through soft tissue release, trigger point, muscle energy or general massage techniques, this form of treatment can help bring more awareness to the body and decrease pain. Sound good? It can also tackle anxiety and restlessness pre or post performance, reduce stress and improve our overall wellbeing.

Prevention is better than cure!

It is handy to know what treatments are appropriate for musicians and their specific needs but as always remember the aforementioned!! The key to any injury is prevention – intense practice (although sometimes unavoidable) should be limited and performed in moderation.

Try taking regular breaks and work towards conditioning and maintaining a strong body by introducing warm ups and cool downs to your practice. If possible gradually increase the intensity and duration of your practice and restrict yourself to reasonable playing times- we know this may be a tricky one!

For any other information regarding the best treatment for YOU and what we offer at TL Health please contact us on or 0208 3059479/0208 3059482.

Remember a clear and open communication between health care professionals, teachers and most importantly Performers will aid in effective Injury Treatment and in the long haul- PREVENTION!


Jessica Coleman

Graduate Intern for Health & Dance Science.

BA (Hons) Dance and Professional Practice, MSc Dance Science.


Performance Anxiety


Stage fright, the heebie jeebies, a bad case of the willies. Call it what you will, but one thing is for sure, performance anxiety is the cruel mistress of many performing artists.

According to a recent survey conducted by Help Musicians UK, 75% of musicians said they had suffered from performance anxiety. Similarly, research from One Dance UK demonstrated that 92% of dancers had experienced psychological difficulty in the last 12 months, with over 30% experiencing performance anxiety. But what exactly is performance anxiety, why does it happen, and the big one we all want the answer to; how on earth do we get a grip of it?

Lets get down to the science-y bit. Psychologists seem to agree that anxiety manifests in two key ways; somatically and cognitively. Somatic symptoms are those we experience physically, such as sweating, racing hearts and needing the bathroom, causing us to feel agitated and uncomfortable. They’re all signs that our body is out of sync with its neutral state, signs of physiological arousal. These experiences are common in all pressurised situations, from test-taking, public speaking and sport, to the performing arts, dance and music. For some, symptoms occur long before performance, from early days in rehearsal. For others, symptoms hit us like a tonne of bricks, right out of the blue, when we’re standing in the wings.

Now here’s the interesting stuff. All of these symptoms have something else in common, something which differs vastly from anxiety. They’re all symptoms of excitement. Just like that feeling of waking up on your birthday, or falling in love, they are symptoms that are telling us that we are energised, ready for action, and prepared to experience something deeply rewarding, of great value.

But what about those cognitive symptoms, those we experience mentally such as worry, apprehension and nerves that ultimately can lead us to a mental block? There’s pretty solid evidence that performance anxiety occurs when an individual perceives an imbalance between the demands made, and their capacity to meet the demands. The key word here is perceived. What if we changed our perceptions of our symptoms, and our perceptions of performance? What if we changed up our mind-set and tried interpreting those symptoms as a sign of preparedness, and positive anticipation. Research we’ve carried out both here at Trinity Laban, and research by international colleagues, demonstrated that perceiving an upcoming performance as a challenge (a chance to thrive and demonstrate competency) rather than a threat (a chance to fail) lead to decreased anxiety experiences in both the days leading up to and very moments prior to performance.

Next time you have an assessment, performance or audition coming up, notice your immediate somatic response. Your interpretation is key. Is this related to a threat? Or actually, is this an optimal challenge? Is your mental investment really worry, or is thinking about an upcoming audition merely a sign that this is something of real value to you, an exciting experience? Learning to change mental habits is by no means an easy process, but a process it certainly is – which means time, patience and trial and error are key. Reframing your thoughts about your next performance may be the first steps towards managing your performance anxiety, and developing healthy techniques for looking after your psychological wellbeing is just as important as nurturing your dance or music technique.


Lucie Clements, PhD candidate Dance Science & Lecturer in Performance Psychology.