10 Reasons to join The Teaching Musician Programme

The Teaching Musician is a postgraduate programme, designed to increase your skills as a professional musician working in music education. It’s for musicians working in the UK and internationally in any genre or educational setting: from instrumental and vocal teachers in schools to musicians working in community settings.

Discover 10 reasons why The Teaching Musician is the perfect programme for you:

  1. Continue to work as you learn

The Teaching Musician is designed to be completed alongside a busy portfolio career.

  1. Make connections

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Build your professional network of fellow music educators from across the UK and beyond, and engage with Trinity Laban’s highly regarded Learning & Participation team, renowned for their outstanding work and support.

  1. It’s value for money

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Achieve the complete MA programme for less than £6,000 and spread the cost over 2-4 years depending on how intensely you would like to study.

  1. Receive world class tutoring

Gain support and mentoring from expert staff actively working in the music education sector and drawn from a variety of Higher Education Institutions.

  1. Learn at home and visit us in the holidays

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Much of the programme is completed online with four trips to the spectacular Old Royal Naval College in Greenwich, London for face-to-face training weekends during school holidays.

  1. Research and reflect

Critically reflect on and develop your practice through engagement with current theory and research which can be built into your teaching straight away.

  1. Get back to the books

Our student services and library teams are always on hand to support you in getting back into higher education and academia.

  1. Boost your employability

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The Teaching Musician alumni have gained recognition for their work as educators through getting work published, delivering training at their music hubs and presenting research findings on the programme at conferences across the UK.

  1. Get out of your comfort zone

Through the Education Placement module, work in an unfamiliar education context to diversify your practice and learn new skills with support from a placement supervisor.

  1. Refresh your teaching practice

Learn new approaches and ideas and tap into current trends in the contemporary music education sector.

Applications for the incoming cohort starting February 2020 close on FRIDAY 29th NOVEMBER 2019. For more information and details on how to apply please visit trinitylaban.ac.uk/theteachingmusician If you have any questions about the programme or application process after reading the information in the programme brochure and on our FAQs page, please contact us at admissions@trinitylaban.ac.uk.

 

Hints and Tips for your Personal Statement

If you are applying to study at a UK conservatoire starting in September 2020, you can now make a start on your application. Here are some handy hints and tips on writing your personal statement from us.

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If you want to apply to study at a conservatoire next year, it is likely that you will need to apply via UCAS Conservatoires – the UK admissions service for conservatoires.

The personal statement will probably take a bit more time and thought than the other sections, as it’s your opportunity to tell your chosen conservatoires why you would make a great student. If you’re feeling a bit daunted then don’t worry – our handy guide should help!

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Where to start

You will have roughly 500 words (4,000 characters to be exact) to write about the qualities, skills and experience that make you suitable for your chosen subject. You will use the same personal statement for each conservatoire you are applying to, so make sure you do not mention anything about a specific institution.

To get started, you might want to create a mind map using the following points/questions:

  • Why are you applying to study and train at a conservatoire?
  • What are your reasons for applying to your chosen programmes?
  • What interests you about your chosen area?
  • What is your experience within your chosen specialist area? For example, membership in youth orchestras, participation in dance productions…
  • What other skills and experiences make you suitable? Extracurricular clubs and societies, employment and/or volunteering experience are great for soft skill development such as teamwork.
  • If you are an EU/international student, you should also mention why you want to study in the UK, your English language skills (if English is not your first language) and why you want to study abroad rather than in your own country.
  • Once you have jotted down ideas using the bullet points above, it should be easier to structure the piece.

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Make sure you…

  • Have plenty of time to write it before the deadline, as it might take a few attempts until you are happy with it
  • Place more emphasis on the skills and experience that conservatoires value the most
  • Make the statement snappy and easy to read
  • Write in a natural style
  • Check spelling and grammar
  • Ask another person such as a teacher, parent or guardian to read it through if you can

Avoid…

  • Exaggerating the truth, as you might get caught out at audition/interview
  • Going off on a tangent, as the word count is limited
  • Sharing your personal statement with anyone else applying to a conservatoire or university, as UCAS Conservatoires has the technology to screen all personal statements to make sure they are original. Even if you wrote yours, there could be serious consequences if there is any similarity between different statements

Do not…

  • Copy any part of your statement from a website or another person, as you could get caught as above!

For more information on how to apply to Trinity Laban’s Music, Dance and Musical Theatre programmes, visit the How to Apply section of our website.

We wish you the best of luck with your application!

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Trinity Laban

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Hip Anatomy & Pilates for Turnout

In line with last weekends ‘World Pilates Day’, Trinity Laban Health have been celebrating this throughout the week, with special themed Pilates workshops for our dance and music students. Check out this educational blog, written by our Physiotherapist, Colette Stanton, (who is also a Mat Pilates instructor) on hip anatomy and turnout. 


Definition of Turnout

Turnout is a term to describe the position of the legs, in many styles of dance, in which each leg is outwardly rotated  and facing away from the midline of the body, if observed from the front.

This outward rotation of the hips is known as external or lateral rotation. Traditionally, ideal turnout has been defined as 180 degrees of external or lateral rotation of both hips combined. However, it is important to acknowledge that there are many anatomical and biomechanical factors, other than hip external rotation, that influence turnout and these factors vary greatly among individuals. Therefore, limitations do exist regarding this expectation.

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Hip Anatomy

The pelvis contains two identical halves, made up of three bones: Ilium, Pubis and Ischium. These three bones help to form the hip socket known as the Acetabulum. The Pubic Symphysis is the joint that connects these bones at the front.

The Sacrum sits between these two halves. It is comprised of five fused bones at the lower end of the spinal column and the coccyx or tailbone that is made up of four fused bones.

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The Femur is the thigh bone, the longest bone in the body. It consists of the round head, the neck, the shaft and two condyles at the base of the femur known as the lateral and medial condyles.

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Structure of the hip joint

The hip joint is a ball and socket joint. The ball of the hip joint is the round head of the femur and the hip socket is the acetabulum (as described previously). The depth of the acetabulum is enhanced by a horse-shoe shaped piece of cartilage known as the labrum.

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Capsule and Ligaments of the hip

The hip joint capsule is a sleeve of fibrous connective tissue and holds the head of the femur in the acetabulum, stabilising it. This capsule is lined with a synovial membrane that lubricates the joint by the secretion of synovial fluid. This capsule is further supported by three major ligaments:  iliofemoral ligament, pubofemoral ligament and ischiofemoral ligament.

Hip muscles that produce Turnout

The Gluteus Maximus

The six external or lateral rotators of the hip: Piriformis, External and Internal Obturator, Superior Gemellus, Inferior Gemellus, Quadratus Femoris

The Sartorius

The Adductors

Lower abdominal and lower back muscles are also important for turnout performance, Pilates can also be an effective approach to use to enhance these muscles.

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Pilates can be an effective method to use to target these muscles.

Keep an eye on the TL Health social media platforms and look out for Colette’s upcoming Vlog to see examples of Pilates exercises aimed at strengthening these muscles of the hip!

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Written by Colette Stanton, Trinity Laban Health Physiotherapist

Reasons to Take the Lead this Summer…

Don’t miss out on our world renowned Musical Theatre Summer School, Take the Lead! The jam packed exciting 5-day course is perfect for aspiring performers of all abilities (aged 16+). If you want to experience conservatoire training at Trinity Laban’s esteemed Musical Theatre department, with industry professionals, this course is for you! Here are the top reasons to Take the Lead this summer:

1. “All that work and what did it get me…”

…it got our tutors to the West End stage! All the Take the Lead tutors are successful Musical Theatre professionals with countless theatre credits to their names. They will guide you through a week of training in musical direction, singing and choreography, giving you invaluable tips and advice. Join our established tutors: Lucinda Brereton, Graham Newell, Omar Okai and Verity Quade.

2. “There’s a place for us, somewhere a place for us”

…that place is London’s leading creative conservatoire, Trinity Laban! A week at Trinity Laban will leave you feeling inspired and motivated. You’ll have access to our award-winning facilities at the Laban Building and get a real taste of theatrical training at conservatoire degree level.

3. “There’s no business like show business”

A week of Musical Theatre training wouldn’t be complete without an evening trip to the West End! This is a perfect way to see everything you have learnt during the week in a professional west end show. Keep an eye out for more information on our website this April!

4. “We go together”

Take the Lead is a fantastic opportunity to meet and train with people who share the same interests and passions as you. People of all ages come from all over the world to participate in the summer school; London welcomes you all! This is the perfect opportunity to make connections within the industry.

5. “You can wow ’em every time, all you have to do is shine”

Take the Lead will be a fantastic addition to any CV or further study applications. In addition to developing your skills, attending the summer school will demonstrate your passion and commitment to your musical theatre training.

The optional extra acting and singing consultation lessons with industry professionals will make your CV and applications stand out from the crowd! Not to mention all the invaluable tips and tricks from the lessons!

6. “I wanna be like you”

Meet Trinity Laban’s successful alumni and ask them all your questions about their journeys from Trinity Laban to the professional world of theatre!

Find out more and book your place today!

Dance Science/Health Work Placement Reflections 2018-19: VOLUME 2

Trinity Laban Dance Science and Health greatly enjoyed hosting our second work placement student of this year – Lloyd Fernquest! You can read all about Lloyds experiences here..

My week at the Dance Science department in The Trinity Laban Conservatoire of Music and Dance has been insightful. My aim was to be able to make a more informed decision on what I would like to do in the future, after I finish my dance degree. This definitely is the case as it has given me the perspective of working within a dance science department as well as being a student on the course.

The team at the department was incredibly welcoming and designed a week around my interests within the field. The interests I gave varied and they still managed to accommodate them, which made the week interesting. For example, I said that I would like to see the equipment that they use for screening dancers. Scott Sinclair the lab technician took the time to go through all of the relevant lab equipment and allowed me to use them so that I could gain a full understanding.

This proved useful as well because by the end of the week I helped with a mini screening that they were doing for Roehampton University. Based on the Nidms screening handbook I also designed the pack that was given to the students as well as the table of results they would fill in during the screening. Combined these tasks gave me a much deeper understanding of the equipment used as I was able to learn, and then apply the knowledge gained.

My personal favourite pieces of equipment were the Leg and Back Strength Dynamometer (LBD) and the MetaMax 3B. The LBD as the name implies tests how much power you can generate in KGs with an isometric half deadlift motion. As I enjoy deadlifts, I became very competitive, wanting to get the highest KG that I could. The MetaMax 3B on the other hand tests the V02 max of the person using it. This is someone’s ability to take in oxygen, defuse it in the membrane of the lungs, disperse throughout the body, and utilise that oxygen as energy in the muscles. This interests me as I am running the bath half marathon in a few weeks and it’s one of the best ways of testing cardiovascular fitness.

From an academic point of view, the experience has also been beneficial. Being able to jump in to different lectures gave me an understanding of how the MSc and MFA in Dance Science works. Also meeting like-minded people to discuss ideas with was very stimulating. Giving me new ideas to look into and to apply to my own learning. Furthermore, as I’m doing my dissertation on sleep dependant memory consolidation in dancers, I have found different theses in the library that apply to my research which were very helpful.

In fact, there was also a lecture on Music Memorisation by a guest lecturer Vera Fonte from Portugal. This lecture though not directly relating to my dissertation, gave me great ideas to enhance my own practice and the practice of other dancers I work with.

Overall, the experience at Trinity Laban Conservatoire of Music and Dance has allowed me to practically learn about the world of work that I could be entering after my last year of University. This new perspective has allowed me to make a more informed choice. Also, I had a lot of fun while doing it.

Written by Lloyd Fernquest, Trinity Laban Dance Science/Health work placement student: 25th February – 1st March 2019

Dance Science/Health Work Placement Reflections 2018-19: Volume 1

Trinity Laban Dance Science and Health were delighted to host the first work placement student of the academic year – Hannah Scott! Here are Hannah’s reflections of her week working with us.

I have been very fortunate to have had the opportunity to gain work experience alongside the amazing Dance Science and Dance Health team at Trinity Laban. I had never before visited the conservatoire but was overwhelmed by its facilities and welcoming staff. Despite my placement being only one week I cannot believe how much I learnt and experienced.

I am currently in my graduate year at Middlesex University working towards my BA honours degree in Dance performance.  Prior to university I completed my dance training at Elmhurst Ballet School followed by working alongside Ballet Cymru on their pre-professional programme. Although I have always been involved in the dance community I have had very limited exposure to Dance Science, despite having a strong interest in the field. The aim of my week at Trinity Laban was to develop my knowledge and understanding of dance science, to both utilise within my practice and also see whether it may be something I wish to pursue further in the future.

Throughout my placement I was given a variety of different tasks and responsibilities to help assist the staff within the department. Unfortunately the current MSc and MFA Dance Science students were away during my week at Laban. However I was extremely lucky to have had the opportunity to speak to almost every member of staff on a one on one basis in regards to their different roles within the department and their relationship with Dance Science. This was extremely valuable for me to discover each individual’s background and their routes into Dance Science.

Throughout my week I fortunate to work closely alongside Lab technician Scott Sinclair. Scott introduced and taught me how to use numerous pieces of equipment used by students on the MSc and MFA programs to collect data and research from dancers. I especially enjoyed learning about the VO2 max test which measures the maximum amount of oxygen an individual can utilize during intense exercise. During the week I was lucky enough to have had the chance to be tested myself. This gave me an insight to see exactly how the equipment worked whilst also learning about my personal cardio fitness and endurance capacity. One of the highlights of my week was putting all I had learnt in the lab into practice by helping assist Scott in his lab demonstration in front of Japanese students from ‘Senzoku Gauken College of Music’. This was great way to test my knowledge from the week and give me another opportunity to use the equipment.

I also worked closely alongside Clinic Administrator Anna Williams and the two Graduate Interns Jessica Lowe and Leanne Steel. It was great to hear about their different journeys into dance science and their positive experiences on the MSc program at Laban. I was particularly interested in Jessica’s thesis in regards to Dancers with learning difficulties. Towards the end of the week I was lucky enough to go and observe a rehearsal alongside Jessica by choreographer/dance maker Sivan Rubinstein. Sivan was creating a piece working purely with dancers with learning difficulties. It was amazing to see these dancers come together and how they were able to recognise different working methods which worked best for them. It was also great to see the response from some of the dancers in regards to Jessica’s project and their enthusiasm for involvement in order to progress her research even further!

During my week I was also extremely grateful to have had the opportunity to speak to both Head of Dance Science, Professor Emma Redding and Program Leader, Liliana Araujo. Both Emma and Liliana gave me valuable insights into the MSc and MFA programs which have now led me to want to apply myself in the future.

I am extremely grateful to everyone I met during my work placement at Trinity Laban and I hope to cross paths again soon!

Written by Hannah Scott, Trinity Laban Dance Science/Health work placement student: 11th – 15th February 2019

News Blast: TL Dance Science & Health in Helsinki 2018

Over 50 Trinity Laban faculty, students and alumni headed off to an international conference in Helsinki last month!

The Dance Science team along with MSc, MFA, PhD students and alumni had the pleasure of attending the International Association for Dance Medicine and Science (IADMS) annual conference in Helsinki, Finland. The conference spanned across four-days and was attended by dance science enthusiasts from all over the world to learn and share new knowledge about the growing field of dance medicine and science.  The event consisted of talks, poster presentations, interactive workshops, movement sessions, round table discussions and debates. Topics included sleep, training load, injury, psychology, hypermobility, creativity and many more. The presenting speakers were of varying professional backgrounds including doctors, physiotherapists, psychologists, educators, scientists and dancers.

Those who attended from Trinity Laban included Professor Emma Redding (Head of Dance Science), Dr Liliana Araújo (Dance Science Programme Leader), Dr Lucie Clements (Lecturer in Dance Science), Elsa Urmston (Lecturer in Dance Science), Anna Williams (Health Clinic Administrator) and Leanne Steel (Dance Science Graduate Intern). Faculty, alumni and current students all contributed to the conference through podium and poster presentations, or by facilitating workshops and movement sessions.

 

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Trinity Laban faculty, alumni and current students.                 Photography: Elizabeth Yutzey

 

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Current and previous Trinity Laban Dance Science faculty members. Photography: Elizabeth Yutzey

 

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Professor Emma Redding represented Trinity Laban by introducing the AJG Howse Memorial Lecture on Management of the dancer’s hip. Photo credit: Julie Ferrell

For several of our students and alumni it was their first time attending the IADMS annual conference while many others have attended year-on-year. See below for thoughts and reflections from our students and alumni.

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Photo credit: Lauren Copping

“I had an incredible experience in Helsinki attending my fifth IADMS conference. It was not only wonderful to see how many Trinity Laban students, alumni, and staff were in attendance, but it was also great to meet or reconnect with researchers from other institutions. During the conference, I also had the opportunity to present my MFA research for the first time post-submission. It was really exciting to share my project and to receive such encouraging feedback and questions from the other attendees.” Lauren Copping, Year 2 MFA student 16-18

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Photo credit: Farah Md Fadzali

“It was the first IADMS conference I attended and it was a really great experience! It was amazing to listen to the latest research findings and how these can be applied in practice. Additional sessions catered to students allow you to connect with your peers around the globe. IADMS is a great opportunity to follow the latest research findings and be surrounded by other researchers, scientists, and teachers, who share the same interest and passion for dance and science!”
Hannah Jussli, MSc Student 17-18

“A great event offering a compact source of inspiration, great for gaining insights into unpublished research and scientific findings and a significant opportunity to network.”Farah Md Fadzali, MSc Student 17-18                                                                                           

“As a new Master’s student, I loved having the opportunity to meet dance scientists at all stages of their career and seeing what the trends in current research are. It was very eye-opening to where the field is heading, what it is still lacking, and the opportunities that await!” –Julie Ferrell, MSc Student 18-19

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Current 2018-19 MSc students and teaching team.  Photography: Reina Zi Teh

“IADMS Conference you were AMAZING! 100% inspired by the work and great people in this field. My brain was stimulated, overwhelmed, thought flooded and I loved it! Can’t wait for next year.” -Freya Simmons, MSc Student 18-19

“I am really grateful I had the opportunity to attend IADMS as a current MSc Dance Science student at Trinity Laban. I learned a lot about the current research being done in the field, which gave me numerous ideas for my own research project. I also met so many different people who are all really passionate about dance medicine and science, both peers and professionals that I hope to stay connected with as I prepare to start my career in dance medicine.” -Stephanie Pittman, MSc Student 18-19

This year we were delighted to have nineteen presentations by Trinity Laban faculty, alumni and students. See the list below of all our presenters!

IADMS presentations

Trinity Laban in action! Photography: Dr Liliana Araújo
Professor Emma Redding & Leanne Steel

Trinity Laban presenters at IADMS 2018 Helsinki

Appleton, R., Clark, T. A qualitative analysis into perceived factors associated with psychological readiness to return to dance following injury(Rebecca Appleton)

Araújo, L. From inspired dancers to inspiring teachers: same passion, role satisfaction and commitment to excellence within multiple professional roles(Dr Liliana Araújo)

Ascenso, S. Mind the mind: findings on mental health in dance. Trinity Laban Conservatoire of Music and Dance. (Sara Ascenso)

Chambers, K. Movement efficiency for dance proficiency: an exploration of individual neuromuscular activation patterns and guided application of techniques to maximise movement potential. (Katy Chambers)

Clements, L., Clegg, H. A mixed methods study of performance anxiety in vocational dance students. (Dr Lucie Clements)

Clements, L., Lefebvre-Sell, N., Redding, E., & May, J. ‘I wouldn’t really call it dancing’: the role of expertise in assessing contemporary dance creativity. (Dr Lucie Clements, Naomi Lefebvre-Sell & Professor Emma Redding)

Copping, L., Clements, L., & Redding, E. Dancer’s experiences with memory and strategies used to improve upon it. (Lauren Copping, Dr Lucie Clements & Professor Emma Redding)

Grossman, G., Redding, E., & Nordin-Bates, S. The porous boundary between dance, art and science: perspectives from dance science, physical therapy and psychology. (Professor Emma Redding)

Harman, G., Redding, E., & Holmes, P. Investigating the phenomenon of dance and music performance through the experience of the performer. (Gemma Harman, Professor Emma Redding & Patricia Holmes)

Lewton-Brain, P. Searching for efficiency of movement: the mesentery and its relationship to dance movement. (Peter Lewton-Brain)

McGrew, M., Mitchell, S., Descoteaux, J., Meder, C., Alvarez, A., Anker, S., & Steel, L. Dance science in the digital age. (Madison McGrew & Leanne Steel)

Mitchell, S., McGrew, M., Anker, S., Alvarez, A., Meder, C., Descoteaux, J., & Steel, L. Student and young professional networking workshop. (Madison McGrew, Sutton Anker & Leanne Steel)

Moravcikova, S. Physiological demands of Brazilian zouk social dance in healthy adults.(Simona Moravcikova)

Nordin-Bates, S., Schwarz, J., Quested, E., Cumming, J., Aujla, I., Redding, E.  Disordered eating attitudes among dancers: a longitudinal study of between and within-person risk factors (Professor Emma Redding)

Paschali, A. The effect of dance-specific aerobic training: An investigation into cardiorespiratory capacity and attitudes towards supplementary cardiovascular training of female dance students. (Anastasia Paschali)

Pooley, A., Clements, L. & Araújo, L. Exploration of emotions and creativity in a choreography class: a literature review (Alexandra Pooley, Dr Lucie Clements & Dr Liliana Araújo)

Sakuta, A., Clements, L. Methodological challenges of dance psychology research: obstacles and future avenues.  (Aska Sakuta & Dr Lucie Clements)

Shi, M. The motivational process in Chinese vocational college dancers: An investigation in the perceived autonomy support, basic psychological needs satisfaction and motivation characteristics. (Menggian Shi)

Squires, L., & Sarah Needham-Beck. Recovery during high intensity intermittent exercise in female vocational contemporary dance students. (Lauren Squires & Dr Sarah Needham-Beck)

Williams, A., Redding, E., Coleman, J., Beach, F., Quin., E & Clements, L. A 10-year retrospective study of contemporary dance students’ standing active turnout. (Anna Williams, Professor Emma Redding, Jessica Coleman, Felicity Beach, Edel Quin, Dr Lucie Clements)

Wyon, M., Allard, G., Nenander, F., Morris, M., & Rafferty, S. Embedding dance medicine and science into teaching and learning (Maggie Morris & Sonia Rafferty)

Yutzey, E., Redding, E. & Clements, L. The evaluation of existing creativity measures in dance and suggestions for a dance-specific measurement tool. (Elizabeth Yutzey, Professor Emma Redding, Dr Lucie Clements)

 

We are looking forward to next year’s IADMS conference already!

Report compiled by Trinity Laban Graduate Interns
Jessica Lowe and Leanne Steel