Walk This Way

Transitions Dance Company is out on the road performing a triple bill of new works, including Award-winning Israeli choreographer Hagit Yakira’s The Ar/ct of Moving Forward.

The simple yet energetic piece is inspired by London’s ‘unspoken rule’ of constant forward motion, and sees the dancers embark on a nonstop journey of walking.

That got us thinking about other famous dance moves inspired by the walk…

9. Powering into the line up is The Strut, embodied by Queen Bey

Look at the catwalk action and hairography!

 

8. Elegantly gliding into 8th is ballet’s ‘Classical Walk’

Noble and graceful, it’s how ballet dancers move on stage when not doing a jeté or pirouetting.

 

7. Flashing back to the seventies at 7 is the Stayin’ Alive Swagger

Well you can tell by the way they walk that Beyoncé was not the first to werk it…

 

6. “Any time you’re Lambeth way, Any evening, any day, You’ll find us all Doing the Lambeth Walk.”

lambeth walk

This Cockney dance craze was first made popular in 1937 by Lupino Lan, and even featured in the musical Me and My Girl.

 

5. Stick on your cowboy boots and get walking to some country music

Look at Alan and Sonia giving their best grapevine as part of the ‘Achy Breaky Heart’ Line Dance!

 

4. Taking it to another level is Trisha Brown’s Walking on the Wall (1971)

Re-created at the Barbican in 2012, the dancers spurn gravity to walk on the walls of the performance space!

 

3. Hitting the gym has never been so fun…

Check out the full video of ‘Here It Goes Again’ to be amazed by more treadmill choreography from Ok Go.

 

2. John Sergeant’s infamous Paso Doble ‘Stomp’

Known to Strictly Come Dancing fans everywhere…the drag and walk! Not necessarily a traditional latin move but memorable nonetheless.

 

1. And top of our list….the iconic Moonwalk courtesy of Michael Jackson

Nailing it.

 

If our countdown has whetted your appetite for some more walk-dancing, then book your ticket for Transitions Dance Company Tour 2018 to see Hagit Yakira’s The Ar/ct of Moving Forward alongside two more brilliant new works.

 

And now, in the words of RuPaul, it’s time for us to….

Transitions: Q&A with company member Orion Hart

Ahead of Transitions’ 2018 international tour, we caught up with dance artist Orion Hart.

orion resized

Image: Orion Hart (Credit: Chris Nash)

How does it feel to be dancing with Transitions as it celebrates its 35th year of touring?

It feels quite amazing to be part of something that has such an extensive history and has produced so many fantastic dance artists. I consider myself very privileged to have been given this opportunity and so far it has been an incredibly enriching experience.

What can audiences expect from the Triple Bill?

The line-up of the pieces in our Triple Bill is definitely very diverse, ranging from the simple beauty of human experience, through to the raw physicality of animal instinct, and even going as far as the downright whacky and absurd. I think that there is something for everyone in there.

What is your favourite piece to perform and why?

I would say that I have the most fun performing the piece choreographed by Jarkko Partanen. We perform the entire work unable to see which makes it both exciting and scary and it’s never the same twice.

What are you most looking forward to ahead of the tour?

I’m really looking forward to how the pieces will develop and shift once we begin to perform them in front of live audiences. It’s my opinion that you can only rehearse something so much and that once you put it in front of an audience is when it really begins to take on a new life.

Transitions will be running a workshop at Rubicon, ahead of your performance at Dance House, Cardiff. What will it be like to return to where you trained?

Rubicon Dance was where I first really began to find my feet as a contemporary dancer and I owe the teachers there so much. It will be great to be able to return to share with the teachers and students some of what I’ve experienced since I left.

 

By Robyn Donnelly (Press & PR)

 

Transitions 2018 Tour | 19 February – 24 May

For full tour details and to find out more about Transitions Dance Company, visit www.trinitylaban.ac.uk/transitionsdc

To find out more about studying dance at Trinity Laban, visit our pages.

 

Transitions 2018: Q&A with choreographer Hagit Yakira

Ahead of Transitions’ 2018 international tour, we caught up with award-winning Israeli choreographer, Hagit Yakira, who worked with the company on brand new piece ‘The Ar/ct of Moving Forward’. 

H. Y. H.

What have you most enjoyed about working with the Transitions dancers?

The energy, lack of pretentiousness, curiosity, commitment, team work. The company dancers were there for the research – and this is truly magical – especially for the way that I work.

The 2018 company is truly international – do you think this has had an impact on the style of the company and/or the way you worked with them?

It does have an impact, of course! This diversity of people, cultures and educations adds acceptance, dialogues, flexibility. It locates oneself in a broader context and I think it encourages humility, which I find truly important.

In brief, how would you sum up your piece?

It’s about the act of moving forward – literally and poetically.

What was your inspiration behind the work?

My main inspiration was London and the fact that I feel there is an unspoken rule here which is the necessity to move forward. Any hesitation, suspension, pausing is an interference for London’s practicality. London is of course is prototype for something broader – I didn’t want the piece to convey this in a direct or literal way. I wanted to find a poetic, physical and metaphorical way to work with the idea of moving forward, with traveling, with time and with the dancers. I wanted them to be seen as individuals – 14 individuals who form a group.

You utilise improvisation in the piece the work. How have the dancers reacted to this and what do you hope the end result will be?

It wasn’t easy. The way I work with improvisation is very specific, it’s extremely physical and requires the dancers to be fully engaged and all the time. It is a constant battle for the body and the mind but in a good way. It is a constant challenge, but a good and rewarding one. One of the dancers mentioned it was as if he was reborn through the process.

The result of that is an autonomy the dancers will experience every time they will perform on stage. The piece will keep evolving – the details, the precessions, the listening to one another – and much more will become better and better, and this will allow the dancers an amazing sense of progression and self-reflection.

Transitions was the very first student touring company and recently celebrated 35 years. Do you think it has had an impact/what impact do you think it has had on the dance landscape?

I believe that the importance of Transitions Dance Company is that it still exists, still vibrant and alive. It is also a platform in which very talented dancers could and can emerge from; they come out from this year very knowledgeable. It helps them be very well prepared for the professional world – in terms of physicality but also in terms of work ethics and maturity.

You were the very first choreographer to work with the 2017/18 company. What was it like to work with such a fresh company?

It was great! The dancers were open, curious, committed and were fully there, body and mind, every day. They were so receptive of me and my work and the research I had offered them. They were totally in it, with it. It was truly inspiring. There was a real sense of growth in this short (very short) process, individually and as a group.

 

By Robyn Donnelly (Press & PR)

 

Transitions 2018 Tour | 19 February – 24 May

For full tour details and to find out more about Transitions Dance Company, visit www.trinitylaban.ac.uk/transitionsdc

To find out more about studying dance at Trinity Laban, visit our pages.