7 reasons to Take the Lead…

Take the Lead is a 5-day summer course, perfect for aspiring performers of all abilities  who want to experience the training on offer at Trinity Laban’s esteemed Musical Theatre department. Here are our top 10 reasons to Take the Lead this summer:

1. “All that work and what did it get me…”

…it got our tutors to the West End stage! All Take the Lead tutors are Musical Theatre professionals with countless theatre credits to their names. They will guide you through a week of training, giving you tips and advice along the way.

2. “There’s a place for us, somewhere a place for us”

That place is Trinity Laban! Come and spend the week at Trinity Laban Conservatoire of Music and Dance and experience what it’s like to study at one of the UK’s leading conservatoires. You’ll have access to our award-winning facilities and get a real taste of theatrical training at degree level.

3. “There’s no business like show business”

We couldn’t have a week of Musical Theatre without a trip to the West End, could we?! On one evening of the week, we’ll head to Garrick Theatre as a group to see everything you’ve learnt during the week put into practice on the professional stage in Mel Brooks’ Young Frankenstein!

4. “We go together”

Take the Lead is a fantastic opportunity to meet and train with people who share the same interests as you. People of all ages come from all over the world to participate in the summer school, offering the perfect opportunity to make connections within the industry.

5. “You can wow ’em every time, all you have to do is shine”

Take the Lead will make a fantastic addition to any CV or further study application. As well as developing your skills, attending the summer school will demonstrate your passion and commitment to your musical theatre training.

6. “I wanna be like you”

Meet Trinity Laban’s successful alumni and ask them all of your questions about their journeys from Trinity Laban to the professional world of theatre!

7. “You are the Dancing Queen”

Due to high demand, Take the Lead now offers two levels of dance classes so you are sure to find a class to suit your skill level and experience.

Final places remaining! Find out more and book your place today at: trinitylaban.ac.uk/takethelead 

7 super reasons to join Trinity Laban’s Young Musicians’ Summer School

The Young Musicians’ Summer School is the perfect opportunity to meet new people, develop your skills and have some fun! With many different activities over three days, you can pick and mix workshops or opt for a 3-day course.

1.Pick’n’mix your courses

Create your perfect Summer School! Choose from our amazing selection of courses and combine them in a way that works for you.

2. Work with inspiring tutors

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Get a taste of what it’s like to study at a leading conservatoire with our fantastic Junior Trinity tutors and workshop leaders. Who better to learn with than professional musicians at the top of their respective industries?

3. Be the next Ed Sheeran

Ever fancied giving looping a go? How about songwriting? With a wide array of new and exciting courses on offer, you can try something new and leave with brand new skills.

4. Make new friends

This year, we’ll be joined by participants from all over the world, from France to the US! Young Musicians’ Summer School enables you to make new friends and learn about music-making in other countries.

5. Perfect for all musicians, whatever your skill level

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We offer junior and advanced levels for our Jazz, Percussion and Guitar courses so whatever your ability or prior experience, you will find a course to suit your level.

6. Get ahead of the game

As well as our short courses, we also have a selection of 3-day courses designed to support students’ studies. For musicians aged 15-18, our A-Level Preparation Course prepares and supports students with A-Level Music and for participants aged 14-18, Music for Film offers support and learning opportunities for young composers.

7. Experience conservatoire life

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Create music at our World Heritage Site campus in Greenwich! Hear your music echo around the courtyard, stand on the spot where huge Hollywood blockbusters were filmed, take a selfie in front of our beautiful building and experience life at London’s Creative Conservatoire.

For more information and to book your place on the Young Musicians’ Summer School, visit trinitylaban.ac.uk/ymss.

10 reasons to apply for CPMM

The Certificate: The Practice of Music Making is a one-year programme developed by Trinity Laban in partnership with The Open University. It offers adults with a passion for music the opportunity to develop their practical music making and performance skills. Here are our top ten reasons to apply:

1. Innovative blended learning

Designed in partnership with The Open University, Trinity Laban’s The Certificate: The Practice of Music Making offers all music-makers an accessible opportunity to develop their practical and performance skills whilst gaining a qualification with a world-leading creative conservatoire.

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2. All music-makers welcome

“As an adult amateur viola player, who only started learning to play the instrument several years ago, I have already benefited from the course in various ways: from learning about different approaches to practice sessions and rehearsals to dealing with performance and performance related challenges.” CPMM student, 2017

The Certificate is perfect for amateur musicians of any genre and instrument. It’s suited for those who make music regularly with others in any type of genre or setting, from amateur orchestral players, DJs, or Samba drummers to folk musicians.

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3. A new approach to Practice and Performance

Feel unconfident to perform or rehearse in a group? Struggling to have meaningful practice? The Certificate can help you to increase your understanding of your own music-making and explore the musical ideas and practice employed by a range of musicians. This learning can be applied to your performance, practice and rehearsal in your own setting, whatever that may be.

4. No audition necessary

You don’t need to audition to gain a place on the programme; it’s all about how you engage with new musical ideas rather than your technical or performance ability.

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5. A world-class teaching team

“The quality of the teaching was outstanding…All the tutors were friendly and supportive, and their enthusiasm was infectious and created the right kind of ambience for adult learners” CPMM student, 2018

The Certificate brings together a diverse range of tutors from Trinity Laban and The Open University to support you in your studies, practice and music-making, along with opportunities to engage with established musicians working in a variety of genres.

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6. Bitesize learning

The course is designed to enable you to fit study within your life. The programme consists of a mix of online tutorials, listening, video, reflective journals and short assignments with around 16-18 hours study per week recommended.

7. An Easter Residential in Greenwich

“Such a fantastic experience. A chance to perform and create with musicians from so many different genres. Very well organised. We were well supported. There really was time for everyone to shine. Perfect end to an amazing week.” CPMM student, 2018

“To get the chance for a whole five days at a London Conservatoire with like-minded musicians was something I never thought I would get the chance to do.”  CPMM student, 2018

Students take part in an inspiring week-long Residential at Trinity Laban’s World Heritage Site home. Meet your fellow students in person to make music, take part in practical workshops, discussion groups and masterclasses, all culminating in a celebratory open sharing performance.

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8. Gain a qualification from a world-leading conservatoire

“Having played with instrumental groups and sung in choirs since my youth, the course has been highly informative and invaluable in consolidating my prior experience and in providing new insights into the practice of musical performance. And having the opportunity to study at a music conservatoire with the academic rigour expected of a Level 3 OU course has been a bonus”. CPMM student 2017

Gain a Level 6 standalone Higher Education qualification certificate, or if you are enrolled with The Open University, the Certificate counts as a 60 credit OU Level 3 module within your degree or other qualification.

9. International applicants welcome

We welcome applications from all over the world, as long as you can attend the Easter Residential. Fees are consistent for all students.

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10. Be part of a vibrant musical community

“I really enjoyed the performance because of the fact that there were so many people from diverse musical backgrounds coming together to make music as one.” CPMM student, 2018

The supportive atmosphere within the student cohort really aids the development of your music-making. The virtual learning environment supports open discussion and fascinating debate and is a great opportunity to meet and exchange ideas with people who share your love of music.

To find out more about CPMM and to apply, visit trinitylaban.ac.uk/cpmm or email the programme team: admincpmm@trinitylaban.ac.uk.

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Variety of Uses for Sports Massage

What is sports massage? 

Sports massage is a type of therapy that focuses on the soft tissues in the body. This includes skin, muscle, tendons, ligaments and fascia which is a form of connective tissue that lines other soft tissues. Sports massage involves the manipulation of these soft tissues and can also include different massage techniques and types of stretching

 

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Image: Sports massage, JK Photography 

What is sports massage suitable for?

Sports massage can be suitable for dealing with many different conditions from sport related overuse issues, to back pain from your office chair. These benefits can be split into four main areas; injury, maintenance, pre-event and post-event.

Injury:  Sports massage has many benefits that can help reduce the risk of injury as well as be used for remedial purposes to help reduce tightness and pain. Sports massage is great at helping to detect muscular imbalances and any potential deep tissue damage which can result in a reduced risk of injury. A key benefit of sports massage is increasing blood flow through the tissues which can lead to faster recovery times and reduce the delayed onset of muscle soreness (or DOMS for short).

Maintenance: Having regular massages can help to keep muscles healthy and supple and can reduce the need for future treatment. Studies have shown that having regular sports massages can help to improve range of motion and flexibility. This in itself can also contribute to lowering injury risk, especially among dancers, for whom flexibility is desired. Having regular massages can also help to identify any particular areas of tension or stress and can increase your overall awareness and education surrounding your body. This can in turn help you to improve your performance and self-manage any conditions you have.

Pre-event: Feeling nervous and tense before a show or performance? Sports massage can stimulate circulation through the body and reduce tension which can be beneficial to help you be on top form before that audition!

Post-event: Sports massage can be just as useful after an event! It can help speed up recovery times, remove toxins and waste products from the body, de-stress you and help fight any delayed muscle soreness you may feel the following day. 

 

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Image: Sports massage, JK Photography 

Sports massage is one of those treatments which can be used in a variety of different ways, and is most effective when used regularly. So whether your a performer, office worker or athlete sports massage can be a useful tool to help maintain a healthy body and banish those tense muscles when they arise!

 

Written by Rebecca Appleton 

Graduate Intern for Health 

 

 

 

 

10 Years On: A Catch Up With Trinity Laban’s First Junior Conducting Fellow

Tom Hammond was the first recipient of the Sir Charles Mackerras Junior Fellowship in Conducting at Trinity Laban Conservatoire (2006-08). Ten years on, Graduate Intern (Press & PR) Robyn met with Tom to hear his thoughts on his training, the music profession, and his career.

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Tom is enjoying success as an orchestral conductor, music educator, record producer and festival founder, and yet couldn’t be further from the Lofty Maestro caricature I was anticipating.  As we chat over Styrofoam cups of coffee in the King Charles’ Court café, he explains how, despite his achievements, he doesn’t subscribe to the Cult of Personality that trails certain individuals in the conducting profession. Instead, Tom believes his job is simply to serve the music.

‘It’s a horrible cliché but it’s true!’ he justifies, ‘The greatest conductors are the ones who actually take a step back.’ One such great is, of course, the late Sir Charles Mackerras, who selected Tom for Trinity Laban’s inaugural Junior Fellowship in Conducting. ‘There he was in his eighties,’ Tom recalls with admiration, ‘but still thinking “every single time I come to something I’m going to approach it like it’s the first time and it’s going to be fresh.”’

Tom expresses how much he learned from his fellowship at Trinity Laban, and clearly enjoyed a wonderful relationship with his mentor – he even had the honour of being the first call Mackerras ever made on a mobile phone, an anecdote Tom shares with a fond chuckle – but Tom didn’t always know how prestigious an opportunity working with Mackerras was. ‘To my shame, I didn’t really know that much about him before…I probably would’ve been incredibly nervous if I had known enough about the incredible breadth of his achievements.’

Perhaps this naivety was due to growing up in the midlands in a place where ‘there wasn’t a huge amount of music going on’. But, as the proverbial black sheep in his non-musical family, Tom went on to study trombone at the Royal Academy of Music. He had an interest in the conducting world throughout his playing career, and only in his early thirties did he hear about the Mackerras fellowship and chose to pursue conducting professionally.

Plagued by ‘terrible imposter syndrome’, Tom worried that he didn’t have a good enough ear to be a conductor, so used the fellowship to improve his skills. Simon Young, Trinity Laban’s Head of Performance Studies at the time, helped him ‘uncover something about myself that I thought I was missing. And now I’m doing CD producing which involves listening to tiny inflections of intonation or ensemble.’

I ask how his producing experience compares to conducting. ‘You’ve got this little barrier when you’re conducting – you have to be driving the car not watching the scenery. It’s amazing what you will hear when you don’t have the distraction of waving your arms.’ Another difference is that he’s not fussy about repertoire as a producer, something that he is zealous about as a conductor, ‘I don’t think anyone should conduct a piece of music they’re not personally convinced is amazing.’

 

Tom is clearly bonkers for classical music, his eyes shining with childlike delight as he discusses his work. One project he is particularly proud of is the Hertfordshire Festival of Music that he launched in 2015 with composer James Francis Brown. Tom insists that he wasn’t looking to start a high-level classical music festival, but with its picturesque location, cultural history, and core loyal music audience, Hertford seemed too perfect to resist. Originally just a one-day event, it has expanded into an entire week for 2018 and has been backed by local politicians, authority, and individuals. ‘What we want to grow is a really major addition to the music calendar every year and a place where we can nurture new music, home-grown talent, community events, and feature a living composer every year. We’ve got huge ambitions.’

Given Tom’s disapproval of the “boys club” of the music profession, I noted that it was funny that he was, by his own admission, playing the same game, having called on his professional contacts when putting together the festival programme. When I queried how he got such big names, such as Tasmin Little and Dame Emma Kirkby, involved, he deadpanned: ‘Pay them.’ Modestly he continued, ‘I’m lucky to work with some fantastic people.’ But one doubts it is simply luck. ‘We got to know these artists personally and hopefully they like us and see what our vision is. We also offer them quite a lot of flexibility. Each year we work with that principal artist figure and say “let’s develop a theme together”’.

This same generosity abounds when he speaks of his fellow musicians. In fact he speaks so highly of internationally-renowned pianist Stephen Hough – who will be the Featured Artist and Composer of the 2018 festival, and who Tom has previously worked with performing Rachmaninoff’s Variations on a Theme of Paganini and Beethoven’s Piano Concerto No. 4 – he sounds like he’s in the deep throes of a bromance: ‘He’s a lovely guy…he can be incredibly easy-going without losing any of the gravitas… in the performance he will bring something extra which is exciting…and he’s genuine as well…and a dry and infectious sense of humour.’

And Tom talks just as animatedly about his ongoing roles with the Palestine Youth Orchestra, Ingenium Academy, and the Yorkshire Young Sinfonia, sounding almost like a proud dad. It is evident that he relishes working with people, whether it’s seasoned pros or aspiring young musicians, and feels strongly about music education and young musicians’ engagement with classical music, wholeheartedly supporting the ethos of music as a tool to foster human connections.

This seems especially important today when, as Tom puts it, ‘Classical Music word is no longer a pastime in which many participate.’ He points to the sector’s necessary and increasing reliance on private funding, and the financial risks associated with pursuing a career in classical music, as reasons why ‘those without resources are excluded.’

To help counteract this, Tom believes that music professionals ‘need to better understand where their audience comes from and find ever increasing ways to feel linked to those they perform to’. It is something that is already part of the ethos at Trinity Laban, which Tom finds deeply encouraging.

We end our chat feeling like we’ve put the world to rights, and I, with tongue firmly in cheek, enquire what his goals are when he grows up. He offers a candid response, ‘frankly just being able to continue to conduct the repertoire that I love until I fall over, I’d be very pleased.’ Wouldn’t we all.

 

To find out more about what Tom is up to visit: http://www.tom-hammond.org.uk/ and www.hertsmusicfest.org.uk

If you’re interested in studying at Trinity Laban, you can find out more at: https://www.trinitylaban.ac.uk/study

 

Written by Robyn Donnelly, Graduate Intern (Press & PR)

10 reasons to join The Teaching Musician programme

The Teaching Musician is a postgraduate programme, designed to increase your skills as a professional musician working in music education. It’s for musicians working in the UK and internationally in any educational setting: from instrumental and vocal teachers in schools to musicians working in community settings.

Discover 10 reasons why The Teaching Musician is the perfect programme for you:

1. Continue to work as you learn

The Teaching Musician is designed to be completed alongside a busy portfolio career.

2. Make connections

Build your professional network of fellow music educators from across the UK and beyond, and engage with Trinity Laban’s highly regarded Learning & Participation team, renowned for their outstanding work and support.

3. It’s value for money

7.TeachingMusicianWebImage2017Achieve the complete MA programme for less than £5,500 and spread the cost over 2-4 years depending on how intensely you would like to study.

4. Receive world class tutoring

Gain support and mentoring from expert staff actively working in the music education sector and drawn from a variety of Higher Education Institutions.

5. Learn at home and visit us in the holidays

KCC_external_lo_res_15_PS_1050Much of the programme can be completed online with four trips to the spectacular Old Royal Naval College in Greenwich, London for face-to-face training weekends during school holidays.

6. Research and reflect

Critically reflect on and develop your practice through engagement with current theory and research which can be built into your teaching straight away.

7. Get back to the books

Our student services and library teams are always on hand to support you in getting back into higher education and academia.

8. Boost your employability

2.TeachingMusicianWebImage2017The Teaching Musician alumni have gained recognition for their work as educators through getting work published, delivering training at their music hubs and presenting research findings on the programme at conferences across the UK.

9. Get out of your comfort zone

Work in an unfamiliar education context to diversify your practice and learn new skills with support from a placement supervisor.

10. Refresh your teaching practice

Learn new approaches and ideas and tap into current trends in the contemporary music education sector.

Applications close on FRIDAY 30th NOVEMBER 2018. For more information and details on how to apply please visit trinitylaban.ac.uk/teachingmusician If you have any questions about the programme or application process after reading the information in the programme brochure and on our FAQs page, please contact us at admissions@trinitylaban.ac.uk.

10 WAYS YOU CAN JOIN US IN #MUSICMAKING

Today we are celebrating Make Music Day, an international celebration of music making, first launched in 1982. The festival will take place in over 750 cities worldwide, inviting anyone and everyone to come together to make music.

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Image: Tas Kyprianou

At Trinity Laban, we believe that music should be accessible to all. From one-off taster workshops to weekly classes, courses, creative arts projects and music/dance collaborations, our public programmes attract participants of all ages, whatever their background or ability.

Here are just 10 ways you can join us in music making:

1) The Certificate: The Practice of Music Making

The Certificate: The Practice of Music Making, is a one-year programme developed by Trinity Laban in partnership with the Open University. It offers adults with a passion for music the opportunity to develop their practical music making and performance skills through online distance learning with a residential learning week at our home in Greenwich.

2) Inspired not Tired – Over 60s Music and Dance

Our Learning and Participation teams are working with Lewisham-based partners as part of Older People’s Arts Network (OPAN) to make Lewisham a great place to grow old! Supported by Lewisham Council, Inspired Not Tired offers a weekly programme of music and dance to older participants aged 60+. See all groups on our website.

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Image: Tas Kyprianou

3) Professional Development

Our professional development programme enables music and dance artists, teachers, tutors and community practitioners to receive high quality training both regionally and nationally. Our music programme offers unique opportunities from extended study for an accredited qualification to shorter day and weekend courses. Take a look at training opportunities over on our website.

4) Junior Trinity

Junior Trinity is a Saturday Music Department for 3-19 year olds. Our Junior Department was the first of a UK Conservatoire to open its doors to schoolchildren on Saturdays in 1906. Since then, thousands of young people have benefited from the opportunities that Junior Trinity brings! From Trinity Teenies aged 3-5 right through to university and conservatoire entrance, Junior Trinity aims to encourage a lifelong interest in music and to give students the opportunities to develop to their maximum potential.

5) Take Part for Children and Young People

We offer a wide range of music and dance opportunities for children and young people. These include collaborative performance platform Lewisham Live, Animate Orchestra for school years 5-10, Schools’ Concerts, Youth Forum and more.

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Image: JK Photography

6) Jazz for Girls and Young Women

We want to get more girls in jazz! Our Girls and Young Women in Jazz day brings young female jazz musicians together to develop their skills through fun and informal workshops and masterclasses. Participants work alongside jazz musicians and students from Trinity Laban, perform as part of an ensemble, share new musical ideas, give peer-to-peer feedback and receive helpful support and advice on their playing from industry professionals.

7) Viola Day

On Saturday 1 July we’re welcoming viola players to join us for workshops, performance opportunities, and masterclasses with world-class violists from our Faculty of Music teaching staff. Visitors can chat with our current students about what it’s like to study viola at a conservatoire, and get some tips about the audition process.

8) Percussion Day

For all those with a passion for percussion, we’re hosting a day for percussion enthusiasts which will include fun and interactive workshops, performances, a trade show of percussion suppliers and demonstrations. Trinity Laban percussionists then take to the Greenwich Music Time main stage to perform a free concert featuring everything from Afro-Cuban fusion to swing!

9) Summer Schools

Music making doesn’t have to stop over the summer! Trinity Laban offers a choice of summer schools in music, musical theatre and dance every year. Participants can go Beyond the Dots in our music summer school for young people aged 11-19, or Take the Lead in a week-long intensive musical theatre training experience, for participants aged 16 and above.

10) Take Part for Teachers & Schools

We provide a number of opportunities for schools and teachers, from in-school workshops with our experienced team of workshop leaders to taster days at Trinity Laban for students considering a Higher Education course in Music or Dance. We also create bespoke programmes for school groups and offer Professional Development courses for teaching staff.

To find out more about Make Music Day, visit www.makemusicday.org.

Feeling inspired to Take Part with us at Trinity Laban? Find your programme here.