7 reasons to join the Young Musicians’ Summer School

The Young Musicians’ Summer School is the perfect opportunity to meet new people, develop your skills and have some fun! With many different activities over three days, you can pick and mix workshops or opt for a 3 day-long course.

1.Pick’n’mix your courses

Create your perfect Summer School! Choose from our amazing selection of courses and combine them in a way that works for you.

2. Work with inspiring tutors

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Get a taste of what it’s like to study at a leading conservatoire with our fantastic Junior Trinity tutors and workshop leaders. Who better to learn with than professional musicians at the top of their respective industries?

3. Be the next Ed Sheeran

Ever fancied giving looping a go? How about songwriting? With a wide array of new and exciting courses on offer, you can try something new and leave with brand new skills.

4. Make new friends

This year, we’ll be joined by participants from all over the world, from France to the US! Young Musicians’ Summer School enables you to make new friends and learn about music-making in other countries.

5. Perfect for all musicians, whatever your skill level

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We offer junior and advanced levels for our Jazz, Percussion and Guitar courses so whatever your ability or prior experience, you will find a course to suit your level.

6. Get ahead of the game

As well as our short courses, we also have a selection of 3-day courses designed to support students’ studies. For musicians aged 15-18, our A-Level Preparation Course prepares and supports students with A-Level Music and for participants aged 14-18, Music for Film offers support and learning opportunities for young composers.

7. Experience conservatoire life

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Create music at our World Heritage Site campus in Greenwich! Hear your music echo around the courtyard, stand on the spot where huge Hollywood blockbusters were filmed, take a selfie in front of our beautiful building and experience life at London’s Creative Conservatoire.

For more information and to book your place on the Young Musicians’ Summer School, visit trinitylaban.ac.uk/ymss.

Transitions 2018: Q&A with company member Paola Drera

Ahead of Transitions’ 2018 international tour, we caught up with dance artist Paola Drera.

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How does it feel to be dancing with Transitions as it celebrates its 35th year of touring?

It’s an honour to be part of Transitions. Not many dancers in Europe have the chance to experience an MA in dance performance and I feel privileged to be a trannie in such an important moment for the company.

What can audiences expect from the Triple Bill?

The audience should expect emotions, physicality and visual effects.

What is your favourite piece to perform and why?

I don’t have a favourite piece. I love how all of three challenge me in a different way.

In Jarkko Partenen’s Lovers your vision is reduced/restricted as a condition of the work. What’s that like to perform?

Touching and hearing become essential. You start to look through your palms. You realise people are close to you because of their breathing, the sound of their feet and the movement of their costume. It is fascinating how other senses counteract the lack of vision.

What are you most looking forward to ahead of the tour?

I look forward to performing with my fellow dancers. They have become my new family here in London and we can’t wait to show what we have discovered in this past 13 weeks of the creative process.

 

By Robyn Donnelly (Press & PR)

 

Transitions 2018 Tour | 19 February – 24 May

For full tour details and to find out more about Transitions Dance Company, visit www.trinitylaban.ac.uk/transitionsdc

To find out more about studying dance at Trinity Laban, visit our pages.

 

10 reasons to apply for CPMM

The Certificate: The Practice of Music Making is a one-year programme developed by Trinity Laban in partnership with The Open University. It offers adults with a passion for music the opportunity to develop their practical music making and performance skills. Here are our top ten reasons to apply:

1. Innovative blended learning

Designed in partnership with The Open University, Trinity Laban’s The Certificate: The Practice of Music Making offers all music-makers an accessible opportunity to develop their practical and performance skills whilst gaining a qualification with a world-leading creative conservatoire.

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2. All music-makers welcome

“As an adult amateur viola player, who only started learning to play the instrument several years ago, I have already benefited from the course in various ways: from learning about different approaches to practice sessions and rehearsals to dealing with performance and performance related challenges.” CPMM student, 2017

The Certificate is perfect for amateur musicians of any genre and instrument. It’s suited for those who make music regularly with others in any type of genre or setting, from amateur orchestral players, DJs, or Samba drummers to folk musicians.

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3. A new approach to Practice and Performance

Feel unconfident to perform or rehearse in a group? Struggling to have meaningful practice? The Certificate can help you to increase your understanding of your own music-making and explore the musical ideas and practice employed by a range of musicians. This learning can be applied to your performance, practice and rehearsal in your own setting, whatever that may be.

4. No audition necessary

You don’t need to audition to gain a place on the programme; it’s all about how you engage with new musical ideas rather than your technical or performance ability.

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5. A world-class teaching team

“The quality of the teaching was outstanding…All the tutors were friendly and supportive, and their enthusiasm was infectious and created the right kind of ambience for adult learners” CPMM student, 2018

The Certificate brings together a diverse range of tutors from Trinity Laban and The Open University to support you in your studies, practice and music-making, along with opportunities to engage with established musicians working in a variety of genres.

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6. Bitesize learning

The course is designed to enable you to fit study within your life. The programme consists of a mix of online tutorials, listening, video, reflective journals and short assignments with around 16-18 hours study per week recommended.

7. An Easter Residential in Greenwich

“Such a fantastic experience. A chance to perform and create with musicians from so many different genres. Very well organised. We were well supported. There really was time for everyone to shine. Perfect end to an amazing week.” CPMM student, 2018

“To get the chance for a whole five days at a London Conservatoire with like-minded musicians was something I never thought I would get the chance to do.”  CPMM student, 2018

Students take part in an inspiring week-long Residential at Trinity Laban’s World Heritage Site home. Meet your fellow students in person to make music, take part in practical workshops, discussion groups and masterclasses, all culminating in a celebratory open sharing performance.

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8. Gain a qualification from a world-leading conservatoire

“Having played with instrumental groups and sung in choirs since my youth, the course has been highly informative and invaluable in consolidating my prior experience and in providing new insights into the practice of musical performance. And having the opportunity to study at a music conservatoire with the academic rigour expected of a Level 3 OU course has been a bonus”. CPMM student 2017

Gain a Level 6 standalone Higher Education qualification certificate, or if you are enrolled with The Open University, the Certificate counts as a 60 credit OU Level 3 module within your degree or other qualification.

9. International applicants welcome

We welcome applications from all over the world, as long as you can attend the Easter Residential. Fees are consistent for all students.

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10. Be part of a vibrant musical community

“I really enjoyed the performance because of the fact that there were so many people from diverse musical backgrounds coming together to make music as one.” CPMM student, 2018

The supportive atmosphere within the student cohort really aids the development of your music-making. The virtual learning environment supports open discussion and fascinating debate and is a great opportunity to meet and exchange ideas with people who share your love of music.

To find out more about CPMM and to apply, visit trinitylaban.ac.uk/cpmm or email the programme team: admincpmm@trinitylaban.ac.uk.

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Walk This Way

Transitions Dance Company is out on the road performing a triple bill of new works, including Award-winning Israeli choreographer Hagit Yakira’s The Ar/ct of Moving Forward.

The simple yet energetic piece is inspired by London’s ‘unspoken rule’ of constant forward motion, and sees the dancers embark on a nonstop journey of walking.

That got us thinking about other famous dance moves inspired by the walk…

9. Powering into the line up is The Strut, embodied by Queen Bey

Look at the catwalk action and hairography!

 

8. Elegantly gliding into 8th is ballet’s ‘Classical Walk’

Noble and graceful, it’s how ballet dancers move on stage when not doing a jeté or pirouetting.

 

7. Flashing back to the seventies at 7 is the Stayin’ Alive Swagger

Well you can tell by the way they walk that Beyoncé was not the first to werk it…

 

6. “Any time you’re Lambeth way, Any evening, any day, You’ll find us all Doing the Lambeth Walk.”

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This Cockney dance craze was first made popular in 1937 by Lupino Lan, and even featured in the musical Me and My Girl.

 

5. Stick on your cowboy boots and get walking to some country music

Look at Alan and Sonia giving their best grapevine as part of the ‘Achy Breaky Heart’ Line Dance!

 

4. Taking it to another level is Trisha Brown’s Walking on the Wall (1971)

Re-created at the Barbican in 2012, the dancers spurn gravity to walk on the walls of the performance space!

 

3. Hitting the gym has never been so fun…

Check out the full video of ‘Here It Goes Again’ to be amazed by more treadmill choreography from Ok Go.

 

2. John Sergeant’s infamous Paso Doble ‘Stomp’

Known to Strictly Come Dancing fans everywhere…the drag and walk! Not necessarily a traditional latin move but memorable nonetheless.

 

1. And top of our list….the iconic Moonwalk courtesy of Michael Jackson

Nailing it.

 

If our countdown has whetted your appetite for some more walk-dancing, then book your ticket for Transitions Dance Company Tour 2018 to see Hagit Yakira’s The Ar/ct of Moving Forward alongside two more brilliant new works.

 

And now, in the words of RuPaul, it’s time for us to….

Transitions: Q&A with company member Orion Hart

Ahead of Transitions’ 2018 international tour, we caught up with dance artist Orion Hart.

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Image: Orion Hart (Credit: Chris Nash)

How does it feel to be dancing with Transitions as it celebrates its 35th year of touring?

It feels quite amazing to be part of something that has such an extensive history and has produced so many fantastic dance artists. I consider myself very privileged to have been given this opportunity and so far it has been an incredibly enriching experience.

What can audiences expect from the Triple Bill?

The line-up of the pieces in our Triple Bill is definitely very diverse, ranging from the simple beauty of human experience, through to the raw physicality of animal instinct, and even going as far as the downright whacky and absurd. I think that there is something for everyone in there.

What is your favourite piece to perform and why?

I would say that I have the most fun performing the piece choreographed by Jarkko Partanen. We perform the entire work unable to see which makes it both exciting and scary and it’s never the same twice.

What are you most looking forward to ahead of the tour?

I’m really looking forward to how the pieces will develop and shift once we begin to perform them in front of live audiences. It’s my opinion that you can only rehearse something so much and that once you put it in front of an audience is when it really begins to take on a new life.

Transitions will be running a workshop at Rubicon, ahead of your performance at Dance House, Cardiff. What will it be like to return to where you trained?

Rubicon Dance was where I first really began to find my feet as a contemporary dancer and I owe the teachers there so much. It will be great to be able to return to share with the teachers and students some of what I’ve experienced since I left.

 

By Robyn Donnelly (Press & PR)

 

Transitions 2018 Tour | 19 February – 24 May

For full tour details and to find out more about Transitions Dance Company, visit www.trinitylaban.ac.uk/transitionsdc

To find out more about studying dance at Trinity Laban, visit our pages.

 

Transitions 2018: Q&A with choreographer Hagit Yakira

Ahead of Transitions’ 2018 international tour, we caught up with award-winning Israeli choreographer, Hagit Yakira, who worked with the company on brand new piece ‘The Ar/ct of Moving Forward’. 

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What have you most enjoyed about working with the Transitions dancers?

The energy, lack of pretentiousness, curiosity, commitment, team work. The company dancers were there for the research – and this is truly magical – especially for the way that I work.

The 2018 company is truly international – do you think this has had an impact on the style of the company and/or the way you worked with them?

It does have an impact, of course! This diversity of people, cultures and educations adds acceptance, dialogues, flexibility. It locates oneself in a broader context and I think it encourages humility, which I find truly important.

In brief, how would you sum up your piece?

It’s about the act of moving forward – literally and poetically.

What was your inspiration behind the work?

My main inspiration was London and the fact that I feel there is an unspoken rule here which is the necessity to move forward. Any hesitation, suspension, pausing is an interference for London’s practicality. London is of course is prototype for something broader – I didn’t want the piece to convey this in a direct or literal way. I wanted to find a poetic, physical and metaphorical way to work with the idea of moving forward, with traveling, with time and with the dancers. I wanted them to be seen as individuals – 14 individuals who form a group.

You utilise improvisation in the piece the work. How have the dancers reacted to this and what do you hope the end result will be?

It wasn’t easy. The way I work with improvisation is very specific, it’s extremely physical and requires the dancers to be fully engaged and all the time. It is a constant battle for the body and the mind but in a good way. It is a constant challenge, but a good and rewarding one. One of the dancers mentioned it was as if he was reborn through the process.

The result of that is an autonomy the dancers will experience every time they will perform on stage. The piece will keep evolving – the details, the precessions, the listening to one another – and much more will become better and better, and this will allow the dancers an amazing sense of progression and self-reflection.

Transitions was the very first student touring company and recently celebrated 35 years. Do you think it has had an impact/what impact do you think it has had on the dance landscape?

I believe that the importance of Transitions Dance Company is that it still exists, still vibrant and alive. It is also a platform in which very talented dancers could and can emerge from; they come out from this year very knowledgeable. It helps them be very well prepared for the professional world – in terms of physicality but also in terms of work ethics and maturity.

You were the very first choreographer to work with the 2017/18 company. What was it like to work with such a fresh company?

It was great! The dancers were open, curious, committed and were fully there, body and mind, every day. They were so receptive of me and my work and the research I had offered them. They were totally in it, with it. It was truly inspiring. There was a real sense of growth in this short (very short) process, individually and as a group.

 

By Robyn Donnelly (Press & PR)

 

Transitions 2018 Tour | 19 February – 24 May

For full tour details and to find out more about Transitions Dance Company, visit www.trinitylaban.ac.uk/transitionsdc

To find out more about studying dance at Trinity Laban, visit our pages.

BANANA CASE AT THE BARBICAN

George Jackson, conductor and previous holder of the Trinity Laban Sir Charles Mackerras Junior Fellowship in Conducting (2015-17), describes what it’s like to get ‘The Call’.

George Jackson portrait B&W © Alexa Wilding

Sunday morning.  It’s 6:30, and for some reason, I am wide awake.

I have just spent a week on tour with the Orchestre de Paris, where I have been Daniel Harding’s assistant: Cologne, Dortmund, Luxembourg, and Brussels.  The week before that, my first Schumann Symphony No.4 with the Transylvanian Philharmonic in Cluj; the week before that, the first leg of the Orchestre de Paris tour, at ‘home’ in Paris, and then in Vienna.

I was grateful for my first full day off in three weeks: Sunday lunch planned with a couple of schoolmates, followed by the new Ricky Gervais show on Netflix.  Bliss!

I manage to doze back off at around 7:30am, but was woken by my phone ringing at 8:21am.  Unusual, I thought, for a Sunday morning…

The previous day, I’d had the pleasure of conducting the premiere of Jasmin Kent Rodgman’s ‘The Letter’ at LSO St Luke’s, as part of the Barbican’s ‘Open Ear’ Festival.  A Jerwood Foundation composer, Jasmin curated an inspiring afternoon featuring performances by the best of London’s spoken word community, culminating in the premiere of her own piece with Salena Godden’s poetry and a quartet of LSO musicians. During the break, I had jokingly quipped to a colleague: ‘Let’s hope Francois-Xavier Roth’s plane takes off tomorrow morning…’.  One of the LSO St. Luke’s plasma screens was advertising Sunday’s Panufnik Composers’ Workshop, where eight brand-new pieces would be publicly workshopped with the orchestra.

As my ringtone echoed into the slumber, I realised how cold it was.  Which means snow.  Which in the UK (and, incidentally, Frankfurt) means travel chaos…

I answered about three octaves lower than usual.  Natalia, the LSO’s artist development associate projects manager, greeted me with her chirpy and friendly tone (she had managed the Jerwood project too).  ‘Morning George!  It’s Natalia at the LSO.  Francois-Xavier’s plane has been temporarily grounded in Frankfurt.  Do you fancy coming in and starting the session this morning?  How far away are you?  Can you get here?’

The slow-motion realisation of what this meant dawned upon me: the chance to spend the morning with one of the world’s finest orchestras, conducting music by the most talented young composers in the UK.  ‘Yes. I’m at home in Hanwell. Can you email me pdfs of the scores? What’s the dress code?’

I scramble around: batons are still in my bag from yesterday; I throw on the only non-creased shirt I can find, some jeans, the nearest shoes.  I make an espresso, but then ignore it, since the adrenaline buzz is already doing the coffee’s work.  An Uber is ordered: ‘Driver completing journey nearby’.  It could take up to 18 minutes…..

I risk it, thinking that if the Uber arrives at 9am, with a 40-minute drive to Old Street, I should have a little bit of time to run through the PDFs at the piano at home, before looking at hard copies in the conductor’s room.

Perfect!

At 8:50am, Uber cancels the order – there are no drivers available.

I call two minicab companies with no luck.  The third one answers and can send a car in 15 minutes.  9:05, so I should get to Old Street at 9:45.  Great.

I attempt to find some last-minute sustenance, and eat all that I can find in the house: a square of Dairy Milk, three Jacobs’ cream crackers and two Trebor mints.  I call Natalia: ‘Please can you leave a banana in the conductor’s room?’  I am incredibly grateful for this later on.

The taxi driver clearly thinks I am mad.  I tell him that it is an emergency, and can he race through London (he agrees, and does a wonderful job).  I spend the next 40 minutes roughly ‘conducting’ my way through the scores, metronome app open in one hand.  Yes, he thinks I am mad.  No time to think about that.

I am now informed that Francois-Xavier’s ETA is 11:15am, which means I will definitely be working on the first two pieces of the day: Grace-Evangeline Mason’s Beneath the Silken Silence and Han Xu’s Buddha Holds the Flower.  I focus on these two, identify a list of questions for each composer, and make sure I can at least work my way through any tempo and metrical changes.  ‘Does “the new minim is the previous crotchet” mean that I should just stay in 2?’  Those sorts of questions.  The things that Simon Rattle likes to call ‘dental hygiene’.

We arrive at the Old Street roundabout.  The friendly driver, for some reason, misses the turn off for St. Luke’s, so we have another go round the roundabout.  Just to keep the adrenaline running.

I race out the car, get to the conductor’s room, and thank Natalia for the banana – which comes in a rather dashing banana-shaped plastic case.  The scores are there, and I race through, underlining, highlighting, making notes.

I have a couple of very welcome visitors to the conductor’s room before we start.  The LSO’s managing director, Kathryn McDowell, says a friendly hello and wishes me luck, and Colin Matthews, who is mentoring the composers, pops in for a quick chat: he gives me a few invaluable bits of advice about the two pieces, and describes how the workshop will run, as a form of public conversation between myself on the podium, principal second violin David Alberman, and the composer in the hot seat.

At 9:59am, the orchestral manager knocks on the door.

Time to go and face the music…

Winner of the 2015 Aspen Conducting Prize, London-born conductor George Jackson will make his Opera Holland Park debut in June conducting a new production of Così Fan Tutte. Other forthcoming highlights include his debut with the RTÉ Symphony Orchestra.

www.georgejackson.net

[First produced on Jessica Duchen’s Classical Music blog. Image credits: Alex Wilding)]