Say Hello to The Conditioning Studio

The Conditioning Studio.

A little slice of heaven that allows you to pick and choose from a variety of equipment to maintain and optimise your ‘performing body’.

In order to support and facilitate your training- Trinity Laban Health are providing FREE use of their new fully loaded conditioning studio.

The Conditioning studio is for TL current students. If you’re a new student or one returning to us here at Trinity Laban- here’s a little overview of what you can expect from TL Health’s exciting new Conditioning Studio.

What do we have to offer?

conditioning-studio

An extensive range of strength and conditioning equipment to suit both the Dancer and Musician.

The studio can be divided into three main areas:

Cardio & Weight Training Area.

 cardio-3

Cardio Machines

Designed to improve cardiovascular fitness which can benefit your overall health as well as your performance. Our available cardio machines are:

Treadmill

An excellent way to build your endurance, allowing for changes in speed and incline giving you the option to vary between walking and sprinting on flat or uphill ground.

Cross Trainer

A cross trainer works 80% of your body’s muscles including thighs, calf muscles, buttocks, back, chest, biceps and triceps. Again an ideal machine for developing endurance. Resistance can be adapted to suit your needs and it allows you to work at a high level without putting unnecessary pressure on your joints.

Wattbike

More than just your average road bike. The Wattbike measures Heart Rate (HR), Pedalling technique, bilateral balance of power and angle of peak force with just the click of a button. Learn more about the Watt bike here

Free Weights

Build, strengthen and maintain muscular and cardiovascular fitness.

Our Weights range from 1kg-40kg

We have a variety of equipment available such as: Dumbbells- Kettlebells- Medicine Balls -Power Bags

 

Mat Work Area

A designated floor area where you can help yourself to a wide range of equipment to condition your dancing/musical body.

The following apparatus is at your disposal:

Yoga Mats- Ballet Barre –High Barrel- BOSU Balls– Battle Rope

TRX Suspension Cables

trx

The TRX Cables may look a little daunting but this fab piece of apparatus is ideal for all fitness levels. The boundless nature of the cables allows you to adjust your position and decrease resistance at any time- making this an easy, safe and enjoyable whole body workout.

Pilates Area

 Note:

We have a range of  Pilates equipment including Cadillacs and Reformers!

Side Note:

This cannot be used during Self-Practice. To take full advantage of the Reformers & Cadillacs come along to one of the FREE Pilates classes.

The Classes

Yoga- Pilates- Strength and Conditioning Classes

ALL FREE OF CHARGE.

Taught by specialist practitioners.

How can I book?

Follow the link below and simply click on the button which looks a little like this.

 health-link

http://www.trinitylaban.ac.uk/trinity-laban-health

 

You will be able to book all future Self-Practice sessions and classes from here.

Remember you will need to partake in a short 30 Minute induction before you can enjoy the self-practice perks of the studio. No induction is required for classes.

If you’d prefer to come and book in person, come and say Hi to a member of the Health Staff at the Health reception- who will be more than happy to help!

Other ways you can get in touch:

Telephone- 0208 305 9479/9482

Email: health@trinitylaban.ac.uk

 

A warm welcome from the TL Health Staff

Clinic Admin Manager

Rachel Emms

Graduate Interns

Fliss Beach & Jess Coleman

What better way to dust off the Halloween cobwebs than to start working towards a healthy performing body right here on campus.

We look forward to seeing you soon!

Jessica Coleman: Graduate Intern, Health

The Benefits of Supplementary Training for Dancers

The dance class has been shown to be fairly ‘stop start’ or intermittent in nature and as a result dancers’ cardiovascular training needs may not be simply met by participating in class or rehearsal. Furthermore, dancers face increasing demands from choreographers, pushing their bodies to the limits in terms of technique, skill and versatility. For this reason it is important  for dancers to consider taking up additional fitness training, and to ask important questions regarding the type of extra training their individual body needs. A good place to start might be to identify areas that require improvement or strengthening. Screening for example is one way you can identify areas that require focus; whether this be in relation to cardiovascular fitness, flexibility, muscular endurance, strength or power. Although the dance class may innately contribute to improvements in certain aspects of fitness (i.e. flexibility, agility, muscular endurance), depending on the individual dancer’s body some of these aspects may need to be addressed outside of the classroom in their own time.  Importantly, a typical dance class does not share the same focus on cardiovascular intensity, nor does it necessarily incorporate training principles such as overload. Overload is needed in order for physiological adaptions to occur and therefore the dance class alone may not facilitate such changes. Additional training has other benefits too. We know that fatigue increases the risk of sustaining an injury in dance, and as increased fitness may help to delay the onset of fatigue it could in turn help to reduce this risk.

jk_photography

Photo: jk_photography

So what form of extra training should you do? The most important answer to this question is it should be tailored to your own specific needs; there is no magic formula or generic plan and previous injury, illness and current workload should be considered. To get you thinking about additional training methods and to also dispel some common myths, we have put the spotlight on just a few types of supplementary training.

Pilates

Pilates

Photo: jk_photography

Since the 1920’s dancers have subjectively reported the benefits of engaging in the Pilates method alongside their dance training. In recent years scientific research has also started to evidence these benefits. Studies have shown that Pilates can help to improve alignment, flexibility and muscular strength in dancers, and due to its focus on fluid and controlled movements it is often a natural choice for dancers. More hypermobile or flexible dancers might wish to choose Pilates-based exercise in order to encourage greater strength and control.

Yoga

There is little scientific research to support the benefits of yoga in dance specifically, however dancers do tend to naturally choose yoga as a form of supplementary training. An unpublished study reported improvements in hip flexion range of motion after a four week intervention and suggested that yoga can offer additional educational benefits. Dancers who are naturally less flexible may benefit from practicing yoga due to its focus on dynamic stretching. Previous or existing injuries should be considered before attending class.

Aerobic and endurance training

It is important for dancers to have good aerobic power to enable them to dance for longer and at lower heart rates before becoming fatigued. Although the dance class can contribute to improvements in aerobic power, due to the intermittent nature of class, additional cardiovascular training such as running or swimming can be useful. Running is a cheap and effective way of training aerobically but if you are recovering from an injury and want to avoid loaded weight bearing activities, swimming is a great alternative.

Plyometric training

It is important for dancers to have power in their legs for both jumping and travelling sequences. Plyometric or jump training aims to increase power (speed and strength) by incorporating exercises in which the muscles exert maximum force in short intervals of time. One study found that such training did improve subjective measures of dancer’s jumping including height, ability to point feet and overall jump ability as assessed by experienced dance faculty members. Again, it is important to consider injury history and workload before engaging in plyometric training. Some dancers are concerned that working on strength in this way may lead to developing ‘bulky muscles’ and compromising aesthetic quality. There is little evidence to support this idea, and the pros of plyometric training seem to outweigh the potential cons.

feldenkrais

Photo: jk_photography

A more somatic approach

Although somatic techniques do not immediately spring to mind when considering supplementary training, practices such as the Feldenkrais Method which aim to increase kinaesthetic self- awareness through movement (without placing extreme stress on the body) can be helpful during busy work periods. Practices such as the Feldenkrais Method can also be of benefit to individuals troubled with stress and anxiety.

*The extra stress placed on the body through supplementary training can cause temporary fatigue. You should aim to leave at least two weeks between end of training and any scheduled performance periods.

Amelia Wilkinson, Dance Science Graduate Intern & Administrative Intern for Health

For more information take a look at these resources.

Beck, S., Redding, E., & Wyon, M. A. (2015). Methodological considerations for documenting the energy demand of dance activity: a review. Frontiers in psychology, 6.

Kefallonitou, M, M., (2014). The effects of Yin Yoga practice on dancers’ range of joint motion : a biomechanical and perceptual investigation (Unpublished thesis). Trinity Laban Conservatoire of Music and Dance, London.

McKinnon, M., & Etlin-Stein, H. (2015, November 09) Pilates: A natural choice for dancers [Web log post]. Retrieved from http://www.iadms.org/blogpost/1177934/231658/Pilates-A-natural-choice-for-dancers.

Rafferty, S. (2010). Considerations for integrating fitness into dance training.Journal of Dance Medicine & Science, 14(2), 45-49.

Useful web resources:

https://www.danceuk.org/healthier-dancer-programme/health-faqs/fitness-and-strength/

http://c.ymcdn.com/sites/www.iadms.org/resource/resmgr/Public/Bull_4-1_pp15-17_Kozai.pdf

 

Street Dance, by a ‘non-dancer’

Street Dance, by a 'non-dancer'
If you have ever read my blog or seen my posts on Twitter or Instagram, you will know that I am a huge fan of Trinity Laban Conservatoire of Music and Dance, and their Faculty of Dance at the Laban Building in Creekside, Deptford. This is where I take my daughter to contemporary kids’ classes on a Saturday. The waiting list for kids’ classes is over 2 years long, so you can tell that the teaching is highly regarded, even from the youngest of ages. This year Trinity Laban is top of the Guardian’s University league table for drama and dance for the fourth year running. Importantly for me, as a place to hang out during my daughter’s class, it is nothing but a pleasure.
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